Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
521 - 540 of 575 Posts

·
Strat - the Asian edition
Joined
·
13,060 Posts
Damn, after reading this, I'm definitely going to be a lot more careful when I ride from now on. I'm a pretty careful rider (in my opinion at least, I've taken a safety course and all that.) but still, you can never be too careful when it comes to stuff like this.
don't let this thread stop you from having fun or cause you to fear becoming an amputee everytime you swing your leg over the bike.

Riding is an inherently dangerous activity and by signing on, you accept the risk that your ticket could be called up.
I wear shit tons of gear even just riding 1 mile down the road (leather pants, jacket, boots, gloves, helmet, spine protector) but I don't for one second delude myself into believing that this couldn't happen to me (knock on wood) or that I might not die (knock on wood, again) while the squid wearing nothing but a helmet lives a long life.
It's all about increasing your odds of survival, that's all you can do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,620 Posts
don't let this thread stop you from having fun or cause you to fear becoming an amputee everytime you swing your leg over the bike.

Riding is an inherently dangerous activity and by signing on, you accept the risk that your ticket could be called up.
I wear shit tons of gear even just riding 1 mile down the road (leather pants, jacket, boots, gloves, helmet, spine protector) but I don't for one second delude myself into believing that this couldn't happen to me (knock on wood) or that I might not die (knock on wood, again) while the squid wearing nothing but a helmet lives a long life.
It's all about increasing your odds of survival, that's all you can do.
:werd: More than anything, this is a lesson.

First, wear all your gear every time you get on the bike as if you're going to go down. As OP posted, doctors said he had "no ankle" as his bone was drug on the road. This almost certainly wouldn't have happened if he had proper boots on.

Second, don't drive like a wild man on public roads. There is a time and a place, and the highway is not it.

I guess there is 6" of the main nerve to the foot is missing, so I have no feeling in the bottom of my right foot. The piece of dead bone from the street they put back in. The doctor's (5 different ones) said the samething "you have no ankle, seems the bones got dragged on the asphalt, you could go thru 2 or more years worth of surgery(bone graphs, nerve graphs) with a 35% chance of it working. If it did work the ankle would be fused together and most likely still have no feeling in the bottom of my foot".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
your prang

wow what a hit!

I must admit im a true 636 fan and would never get rid of mine.....but one thing you must give the bike the respect it deserves?

I know youve hurt yourself but your still here, good luck with your recovery

Dave in England
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,522 Posts
I know this thread is older than old, and I feel sorry for the OP, but, I don't think people should be deterred away from getting on a 600 as their first bike.

Heck, I bought a 900 liter bike for my first bike. I was flamed up and down by everyone saying I was going to die .. but I rode nearly 2500 miles on it without any form of fear/danger before I sold it for my 636.

It's all about the rider in my opinion.
 

·
Strat - the Asian edition
Joined
·
13,060 Posts
good for you general patton, you know what you just did?



that's right, you won the lottery. I wonder how many other people will win the lottery if they try it your way.

There will always be a few people out there who jump on a zx-14 or a hayabusa as their first bike, wear no gear, never get in a crash, never even drop the bike, and live to a ripe old age. Good for them, but for every one of them, there are at least 100 who have died along the way.


And no, you're dead wrong. It's not all about the rider. :thumbdown:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,522 Posts
Can't say I agree with you (of course).

If you're not in it for speed, then why not a big bike? It seems rather easy to control the throttle on my 900, and to be honest, riding my friends 600, I didn't sense much of a difference, because I accelerated at a pace I was comfortable with.

See, unlike the OP, and probably A LOT of members on this forum, I never seen triple digit speeds .. never desired it, just like I don't see triple digit speeds in my GTO. I ride to enjoy the ride, and that's enough for me.

Pretty sure it's all about the rider, if not, what is it about? You said so yourself, some people do it, other people do it and don't live to tell about it. You think it's luck? Luck has nothing to do with it. I would assume it is the mental state of the rider. I'm not saying I am amazing, or a lottery winner (Though, I sure wish I was :D) .. I sold my 900 because I WANTED a smaller bike, but, not once did I feel like I couldn't control it.

By the way, I'm not sitting here recommending anyone to go out and buy a liter bike for their first bike .. in fact, I may never own one again. Riding my friends GSXR 600 and ZX6-R, I felt like there was more than enough power between my legs, and it was a much more comfortable ride. If someone asked me if they should get a liter bike to start, I would say Hell No .. no point .. though, I wouldn't not recommend a 600. I mean, ideally, I'd say get a more comfortable bike for your first bike, like a sport bike, instead of a supersport.

When I was first looking at bikes, I was actually looking at the Kawasaki 250R. I've seen what bikes can do. My family has been affected by motorcycles for a long time, positive, and negatively.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
I never really thought about riding boots but after reading this thread I will definatley buy a pair.

On another topic General Patton does have a point, if a new rider has a cautious wrist he can start out on a 600. It's all about controlling yourself even more so than controlling the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,620 Posts
I never really thought about riding boots but after reading this thread I will definatley buy a pair.
If for no other reason, this thread has served its purpose. Welcome to the club man, don't go out there unprepared. :thumbup:

I'll just disagree on your other point. There is more that goes into safety on a motorcycle than a "cautious wrist" as so many people like to claim, and a 600 and 1000 fail versus a smaller bike or one with a less aggressive engine configuration. Other bikes are better for beginners because the margin of error is much wider, plain and simple.
 

·
Ninja Bike Forum Mod
Joined
·
22,254 Posts
Can't say I agree with you (of course).

If you're not in it for speed, then why not a big bike? It seems rather easy to control the throttle on my 900, and to be honest, riding my friends 600, I didn't sense much of a difference, because I accelerated at a pace I was comfortable with.

See, unlike the OP, and probably A LOT of members on this forum, I never seen triple digit speeds .. never desired it, just like I don't see triple digit speeds in my GTO. I ride to enjoy the ride, and that's enough for me.

Pretty sure it's all about the rider, if not, what is it about? You said so yourself, some people do it, other people do it and don't live to tell about it. You think it's luck? Luck has nothing to do with it. I would assume it is the mental state of the rider. I'm not saying I am amazing, or a lottery winner (Though, I sure wish I was :D) .. I sold my 900 because I WANTED a smaller bike, but, not once did I feel like I couldn't control it.

By the way, I'm not sitting here recommending anyone to go out and buy a liter bike for their first bike .. in fact, I may never own one again. Riding my friends GSXR 600 and ZX6-R, I felt like there was more than enough power between my legs, and it was a much more comfortable ride. If someone asked me if they should get a liter bike to start, I would say Hell No .. no point .. though, I wouldn't not recommend a 600. I mean, ideally, I'd say get a more comfortable bike for your first bike, like a sport bike, instead of a supersport.

When I was first looking at bikes, I was actually looking at the Kawasaki 250R. I've seen what bikes can do. My family has been affected by motorcycles for a long time, positive, and negatively.
It's about the bike's ability to bite you in the ass when in emergency situations. If you try to do an evasive maneuver on a 250 you're never going to be doing triple digit speeds in under 5 seconds like you can on a 600 or bigger bike in the low gears. If you have a panicked reaction on a 600cc+ a highside or worse is almost imminent. In emergency situations it should never be about the horsepower, but you're ability as a rider to brake and evade impending doom.

I've heard of many riders who were 'mentally' ready for a big bike but then have an epiphany in an emergency situation where they've shit themselves when push came to shove in an evasive maneuver or twisty ride where they almost met their maker. Which is what happened in this case, he wasn't ready for the acceleration capabilities of the bike and when push came to shove it bit him good and hard.

There's a good reason that most of the upper echelon motorcycle racers and riders started life on 125s, 250s or similar. It forces you as a rider to focus on smooth technique to be fast and will allow you to walk away from hairy situations in more cases than any supersport (600 class) or superbike (1000 class) or God forbid a hypersport (ZX-14 or Hayabusa) will.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
486 Posts
Not turning this to a religious post but I believe in God. Im not the most religious person but I do believe when its my time that they will take me... Im not scared to do anything but i also wont purposely play russian roulette... Ride with what you are comfortable with and know when you can play.. keep the rubber side down and watch out for those dumb asses pulling out infront of you... the only time you are safe is if you are in a bunker 100 ft under the ground... live life to the fullest and when its your time its your time... I will say i have a damn ass fast guardian angel..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,522 Posts
Yeah I can understand that. It's why I wish I learned to ride when I was younger. I am far too big to fit on a 250, and even a 600 looks "small" on me, but, I find it to be "just right".

I've never been in any sticky situations with my old 900, and that could be why I say I was fine on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
753 Posts
I've never been in any sticky situations with my old 900, and that could be why I say I was fine on it.
That quote sums it up...

Anyone can ride any bike fine when never faced with a riding situation that calls for the rider to be highly skilled and comfortable with the machine. I am happy you never faced a sticky situation but, had you, you may sing a different tune about starting on a 900.

No newb sits on a liter bike and says "Hey, I am going to rip this throttle wide open and see what happens." What usually happens is that the situation (road surface imperfections, the need to swerve due to an idiot in a car) makes you ACCIDENTALLY rip that throttle open... thats where the danger lies.

Also, the power of the engine is always the first thing that people point out when they are trying to steer a new rider away from a supersport. It is rarely ever pointed out that the brakes on these machines are just as likely to put you on your ass... or your head... or on a car's hood. Supersport brakes are incredibly good at what they do. No new rider knows how to "squeeze" a brake lever in a panic situation... they tend to grab a whole fist full of lever and shit goes wrong.

I believe that the 250 is the ideal starter bike but I am not part of the "250 police" that will say it is the ONLY good starter bike. I will, however, advocate twin engines over inline 4's to new riders every single time.

-Pat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
941 Posts
I would imagine that its been discussed in the 54 pages here but I am wonder what condition his ankle would have been in if he had worn appropiate riding boots...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,620 Posts
I guess there is 6" of the main nerve to the foot is missing, so I have no feeling in the bottom of my right foot. The piece of dead bone from the street they put back in. The doctor's (5 different ones) said the samething "you have no ankle, seems the bones got dragged on the asphalt, you could go thru 2 or more years worth of surgery(bone graphs, nerve graphs) with a 35% chance of it working. If it did work the ankle would be fused together and most likely still have no feeling in the bottom of my foot".

I opted for the high tech prostectic. Shit I have a video of navy seals with the same prostesis work out and are now back on active duty. I mean I'm no seal it just gives me hope.

Plus it dosent really bother me
Here it is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
941 Posts
Damn... Must wear boots all the time, no question about that. Even a small lowspeed lowside can mess your ankle up beyond repair :eek:hno:
 
521 - 540 of 575 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top