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Originally posted by Enjoy Life
Stop blaming it on a newbie on a 600cc+ bike. I started on a 2004 ZX-6R and just got a 2005 ZX-6R. I haven't crashed yet, but if/when I do, I guess it's b/c I started on a 600CC+ bike? Just how many miles do I have to put on a bike before people consider you not a newbie?

To the OP, sorry about your misfortune, but if you were on a 500cc bike doing 90+ miles an hour coming to a stoplight, the end result probably would have been the same. If you were wearing Sidi Vertebras, or like, (unless I missed that part in the post) thinks may have been different. I wish there was another way other than amputation, that sucks.
[:Agree]

i also started on my 04 636. absolutely no experience before then. now i have 9 months and almost 10k miles under my belt. yea these things beg to be opened up but its up to the rider to be responsible. it took a few close calls back when i was just starting to make me realize just how dangerous it can be if u dont use ur head. one day took a turn too fast and almost ended up hitting a car head on. its fukin scary when u feel like death is creeping up on u and u cant do anything about it. and u also dont have any control of the imperfections on the ground or what the other cars can do.

u gotta know ur limits. good luck with ur recovery.
 

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The real problem with this is the motorcycling community. Either dealers are just out to make $$$ and selling bikes to people without knowing if they can even ride or not. Or, it's a private seller who has the "once it's sold I don't give a fuck" attitude. Those are the real people to blame, what do you expect a noob to do and how do they really know if what they are doing is going to lead to a crash. That's my 2 cents on this.
 

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Originally posted by MogZx-6r
people like that are why insurance rates are ungodly high. the reason why people get in alot of recks are because they act immature on bikes. If you only have 1400 miles under ur belt and ur riding that aggressive on the street its bad news. last time i checked the speed limit wasn't 85 or 95 or whatever on onramps. Don't get me wrong im sympathetic towards the accident i wouldn't wish that on anyone. But outcomes like that can be avoided or decreased when u think rationally and within your limits. Flash Ahh makes a good point.
Thats not necessarilly the reason why insurance rates are so high. They're high because thats what the insurance companies can get away with. If you have a clean record you can get a good insurance company and great rates. If your rates are high it's because you have a bad driving record or accidents. You ever hear of lawsuits? Those happen to drive up insurance costs too. Fake insurance claims. People suing for bullship whiplash.
 

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Originally posted by creepshow
I guess I don`t feel like the most of you? Maybe I`m an ass but, look this is your first bike, people warned you, you have no riding skills on a powerful bike, head shake over and over, riding like a nut, and worst of all you don`t feel bad or scared by the sound of things. You will probably turn right around and do something simular and either kill youself or, worse, someone other than yourself. Sure we get begged to open them up and I do but, you have to use some sence. Sure anything can happen anywhere. Off ramps and freeways are not the place. Honestly, I think your a dumbass and you should buy a exercise bike and a fan and pretend. You don`t deserve to be on the road where you may kill or hurt someone else. :(
For the most part..You're 100% correct, you are an ass.
 

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Originally posted by natronazx6r
The real problem with this is the motorcycling community. Either dealers are just out to make $$$ and selling bikes to people without knowing if they can even ride or not. Or, it's a private seller who has the "once it's sold I don't give a fuck" attitude. Those are the real people to blame, what do you expect a noob to do and how do they really know if what they are doing is going to lead to a crash. That's my 2 cents on this.
So, if I am 30 years old, have a level head, have a clean driving record, no tickets, no accidents, have taken the motorcycle safety course, that the dealer shouldn't sell the a 636 if I have the $? I think that thinking is ignorant. What's to say that I will hurt myself or someone else anymore so on a 636 than a 500?
 

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Why is everyone trying to figure out who to blame? Who cares. I thank him for putting the pictures up and telling his story. Makes you realize how dangerous it can be. And to the guys pretending they dont open the bike up here and there telling him he was irresponsible. I guarantee you did the same at some point. Maybe not the same as him but nobody rides these under 70 all the time. It's obvious he learned his lesson and he learned it hard. His spirits are up and I think thats awesome. He already said that he's gonna take classes and get a less aggressive bike next.
 

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Originally posted by Enjoy Life
Originally posted by natronazx6r
The real problem with this is the motorcycling community. Either dealers are just out to make $$$ and selling bikes to people without knowing if they can even ride or not. Or, it's a private seller who has the "once it's sold I don't give a fuck" attitude. Those are the real people to blame, what do you expect a noob to do and how do they really know if what they are doing is going to lead to a crash. That's my 2 cents on this.
So, if I am 30 years old, have a level head, have a clean driving record, no tickets, no accidents, have taken the motorcycle safety course, that the dealer shouldn't sell the a 636 if I have the $? I think that thinking is ignorant. What's to say that I will hurt myself or someone else anymore so on a 636 than a 500?
I agree. In my accident No matter what bike I had the result would have been the same.
 

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Originally posted by: Enjoy Life
So, if I am 30 years old, have a level head, have a clean driving record, no tickets, no accidents, have taken the motorcycle safety course, that the dealer shouldn't sell the a 636 if I have the $? I think that thinking is ignorant. What's to say that I will hurt myself or someone else anymore so on a 636 than a 500?
No they shouldn't, they should sell you an older less powerful bike. If you're 30 with a "level head", why would you want a sportbike. ;)
 

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Well, that's how I started, and both bikes I have never had a problem. I just took it easy to learn. I don't think it's anyone's right to tell me what I can and can't buy.
 

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Discussion Starter #70
Originally posted by ap636
Why is everyone trying to figure out who to blame? Who cares. I thank him for putting the pictures up and telling his story. Makes you realize how dangerous it can be. And to the guys pretending they dont open the bike up here and there telling him he was irresponsible. I guarantee you did the same at some point. Maybe not the same as him but nobody rides these under 70 all the time. It's obvious he learned his lesson and he learned it hard. His spirits are up and I think thats awesome. He already said that he's gonna take classes and get a less aggressive bike next.
Hey, thanks
 

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Man this just re-affirms my stance on wearing racing boots every time you ride.

I had a crash back in November too. This lady pulled out infront of me at 75, and I too jumped off the bike. Tore two tendons in my right ankle. Every one I've told said that if I had been wearing a good pair of race boots that it wouldn't have happened, and I wouldn't have a damn thing wrong with me.

Now I don't know if they would have completely saved your ankle, but I'll bet that you wouldn't be going through the amputation.

Well anyways thanks for the story, Good luck.
 

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Well Enjoy Life, you are an exception seeing as how you forced yourself to "took it easy to learn". Obviously you have a head on your shoulders.

Not every one does though and I've know people who never road before, they walked into dealerships and came out with a brand new race bike. Two days later, they crash and they don't know why.

If the dealer doesn't size you up right for your experiance, they are only huring the sport. It's like giving a child a loaded gun and telling them to go ahead and play with it, it's just a toy.
 

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I played with loaded guns when I was a kid, but it was under adult supervision of course! I also forgot to mention, the most squidly I have ever been was jeans, boots, gloves, jacket, helmet
 

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man thank you so much for sharing that story-a lot of my friends made fun of me when i took the msf course and after that i bought a kaw ex250 and i rode it for about a year. And finally i bought my 04 636 and i feel pretty comfortable on it, but i am sure i would've end up hurting myself if i did the same thing you did. now i rock my SIDI boots, gloves, and my jacket and some draggin jeans (dragginjeans.com) for my butt every where i go and it doesnt matter where it is or how far.

Well its all in the past now so there is no point of talk about it. It's just amazing to me how you are in such good spirits, that right there shows a lot about you character and i respect you for that

get well bro!
ride safe
 

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yup i just bought a damper. hope you recover ok and dont have to lose anything. but i would consult other doctors cause i would not want to have to amputatee. anyways good luck
 

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You know, I've been reading this thread for a few days and I agree with just about everyone here.

Firstly, I wish EWOOD420 a very speedy recovery and hope that you recover quickly and with as little pain as possible. Your spirits are up and that is great. It's unfortunate that this kind of thing happens to anyone.

Secondly, there are a couple of things about this that stuck in my mind. As a newbie who is about to buy an '05 6R this made me very nervous (although, I already was), the story has made me think very carefully about what I intend to do. I also thought about the equipment that was not being used at the time of the accident and the damage to the equipment that was being used (not too much). It seems to me that a good set of boots would have saved a lot of pain. Next I considered that the rider was riding very fast on uneven ground on a bike which was know for headshakes. I've also talked to a number of people about the method of recovering from headshake, ie. to throttle down and sit up and hopefully ride it out. One of my friends who's been riding for a number of years was surprised that the rider bailed off the bike.

I already intended to buy all the right gear to start with, including a back protector and boots. I already intend on going to as many courses as I can (afford) and making sure I take my time. I've been practicing on an R6 and have been keeping the RPM below 6k (or so) becuase I don't believe that I can control the bike effectively if I crack the thing wide open. I've ridden before but not for a while and not on a road bike. I'm just trying to treat the bike with respect and keep in mind how dangerous these machines are so that I don't make the mistake of overestimating my skills (which would be hard at this stage, I don't really have any!).

I think that one of the issues that hasn't been raised here is just how easy it is to get a motorcycle license, I mean really, 5 questions about space and basic, basic stuff. Then you can go out and buy a 'busa? I don't think that there's adequate training for people in the US to allow newbies (like me) to go out and do this. In other countries there's a scale of some kind limiting the bikes that a new rider can ride. In Australia it's based on CCs and in the UK it's HP. But you also have a provisional license system whereby the rider is not only limited to which bikes they can ride but also when, where and how fast. That's not to say that this would prevent inexperienced riders hurting themselves, what I'm getting at is that there's a system in place to account for the learning required to ride a bike competently. I'm not saying that we should adopt these systems in the US necessarily but that there should be a way that a certain level of skill has been obtained beyond riding in circles (and 8s) and making a couple of turns *before* people would be permitted to jump on the most powerful machinery.

Of course, this doesn't mean that these kind of terrible and unfortunate accidents wouldn't happen but that people would have obtained more experience in the hope that they would recognize that they're putting themselves in this kind of danger. I include myself in this group of people.

Again, best of luck to EWOOD420, your attitude is excellent and that can only help in your recovery, as the Japanese say gambate (fight hard)!

Dan
 

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Originally posted by DanielC
You know, I've been reading this thread for a few days and I agree with just about everyone here.

Firstly, I wish EWOOD420 a very speedy recovery and hope that you recover quickly and with as little pain as possible. Your spirits are up and that is great. It's unfortunate that this kind of thing happens to anyone.

Secondly, there are a couple of things about this that stuck in my mind. As a newbie who is about to buy an '05 6R this made me very nervous (although, I already was), the story has made me think very carefully about what I intend to do. I also thought about the equipment that was not being used at the time of the accident and the damage to the equipment that was being used (not too much). It seems to me that a good set of boots would have saved a lot of pain. Next I considered that the rider was riding very fast on uneven ground on a bike which was know for headshakes. I've also talked to a number of people about the method of recovering from headshake, ie. to throttle down and sit up and hopefully ride it out. One of my friends who's been riding for a number of years was surprised that the rider bailed off the bike.

I already intended to buy all the right gear to start with, including a back protector and boots. I already intend on going to as many courses as I can (afford) and making sure I take my time. I've been practicing on an R6 and have been keeping the RPM below 6k (or so) becuase I don't believe that I can control the bike effectively if I crack the thing wide open. I've ridden before but not for a while and not on a road bike. I'm just trying to treat the bike with respect and keep in mind how dangerous these machines are so that I don't make the mistake of overestimating my skills (which would be hard at this stage, I don't really have any!).

I think that one of the issues that hasn't been raised here is just how easy it is to get a motorcycle license, I mean really, 5 questions about space and basic, basic stuff. Then you can go out and buy a 'busa? I don't think that there's adequate training for people in the US to allow newbies (like me) to go out and do this. In other countries there's a scale of some kind limiting the bikes that a new rider can ride. In Australia it's based on CCs and in the UK it's HP. But you also have a provisional license system whereby the rider is not only limited to which bikes they can ride but also when, where and how fast. That's not to say that this would prevent inexperienced riders hurting themselves, what I'm getting at is that there's a system in place to account for the learning required to ride a bike competently. I'm not saying that we should adopt these systems in the US necessarily but that there should be a way that a certain level of skill has been obtained beyond riding in circles (and 8s) and making a couple of turns *before* people would be permitted to jump on the most powerful machinery.

Of course, this doesn't mean that these kind of terrible and unfortunate accidents wouldn't happen but that people would have obtained more experience in the hope that they would recognize that they're putting themselves in this kind of danger. I include myself in this group of people.

Again, best of luck to EWOOD420, your attitude is excellent and that can only help in your recovery, as the Japanese say gambate (fight hard)!

Dan
True...the license process here in the US is a joke. I know people who took the Motorcycle course on a scooter and you get a motorcycle license when you're through.
Also, what is the sense on taking the MSF on a 250 and then going to get a 600? Why not taken the MSF on the bike you're going to be riding in the first place?
 

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Yeah, I called a school who said that they use scooters for licensing and I was shocked. Talk about making it easy. How can they be licensed by the gov't. to do that? Here, jump in this gokart and do this test and thankyou sir here's your Lamborghini? Anyway, I crossed them of the list immediately.

Dan
 

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To all of you writting about how you started on a 600 and made it. What do you want a cookie? I got news for you all, the ride isn't over. You can all say how safe you are but the truth is, you all bought the fastest thing on the market because you like to go fast.
 
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