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Discussion Starter #1
So got my wheels mounted and went to install brake calipers back on rotors. Got that done but Im having problems being able to get any brake pressure from either the front and rear. Now the rear was never touched all I did was take the caliper off the rotor and that was it. I do have an aftermarket rear set attached now but i can push down on it for days and it wont build pressure. I opened the bleeder value in the back and pushed down and brake fluid came out so I know its pumping but it wont build pressure. Now the front was completely drained and im trying to feed the fluid back in but none wont leave the resevior. Whats a good way to get these brake back working???
 

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There should be another bleeder valve up by the front reservoir. Bleed that one first. Then close it and bleed from the valves on each caliper.
 

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pistons could be seized. Try removing the caliper, open the reservoir cap. Push the pistons into the caliper, see if you see a rise in the fluid level in the reservoir. Also with the caliper off, depress the brake lever and see if the pistons move forward at all. You may have an air pocket trapped somewhere mid line too, so if that's the case, totally drain and re-fill/re-bleed the system.

On your fronts, start with the MC first, bleed air out of that first, then move to the calipers. It does take some time to get the fluid to enter the system on the front if it's totally drained as there will be air pockets and there is more real estate in the lines than on a rear system. I've always done it MC, right caliper, left caliper, repeat, all the while never letting the fluid go all the way down on the reservoir.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I figured it out, turns out I was bleeding wrong. Got pressure back up in the front and rear and finally took the bike out for a quick spin around the alley. First time back on wheels in about 14 months, and it felt great. Then I lost the chain link pulling back into the alley......Oh well......at least I know the bike can still roll. Still waiting on my shifter rod and rear brake light kit to come in anyway so back to the garage for a few more days.....jesus im itching out here.

Current state of the bike:


Gotta get that freakin rim tape off!!!!!!
 

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can you explain what 'bleeding wrong' means? glad you figured it out, what ever the issues was.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
can you explain what 'bleeding wrong' means? glad you figured it out, what ever the issues was.
Lol this is my first ever real bleed job I thought I was suppose to just open the screw and keep pumping the brakes till nothing but fluid came out didn't know I had to keep closing the screw first
 

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Good to see you almost back on the road again, T. You came a long way with that bike. There's a lot of little tricks to bleeding brakes that you'll pick up over time. Here's one, courtesy of VH in DC -

After you have done all you can do to get the air out and have a spongy lever but can pump up the brakes a little, Pump up the brakes as best you can and then tape the lever to the Handle Bar and let it sit a few hours and come back and hold the lever in and remove the tape and you are done! (Slowly release the lever after the tape is removed!) By Taping, I mean take Duct Tape and wrap it a few times around the held in lever! I always fold about 6 inches over at the end of the tape to keep the sticky stuff off the controls!


I use a cloth instead of tape, but the results are great - a rock hard lever.
 

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^ yup, zip tie on the brake lever, tight, over night or 24 hours.
 

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The theory is: it puts the brake fluid under pressure, that causes any small air bubbles to rise into the reservoir overnight. This trick always seems to improve lever feel on any bike.
 

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Close, but no 2nd gear rubber?
 

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close.
it actually opens the port in the MC and allows the air to escape into the res.
I know there's an unwritten rule that everyone that owns both a bike and a wrench that fits on said bike is automatically a master mechanic that goes on the internet to tell others how to wrench on their bike whilst asking how to go about fixing their own bike.................

so I gotta inquire, if applying the front brakes and holding it there "opens the port in the MC and allows air to escape into the res" what's to stop brake fluid, under pressure, from returning to the master cylinder there-by releasing the brakes, and negating the application and holding of the brake lever to begin with?
 

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I know there's an unwritten rule that everyone that owns both a bike and a wrench that fits on said bike is automatically a master mechanic that goes on the internet to tell others how to wrench on their bike whilst asking how to go about fixing their own bike.................

so I gotta inquire, if applying the front brakes and holding it there "opens the port in the MC and allows air to escape into the res" what's to stop brake fluid, under pressure, from returning to the master cylinder there-by releasing the brakes, and negating the application and holding of the brake lever to begin with?
huh? who is asking for what exactly?


the piston in the mc applies and holds the pressure. if it releases pressure/fluid the mc is bad and needs rebuilt, or replaced.
 

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huh? who is asking for what exactly?


the piston in the mc applies and holds the pressure. if it releases pressure/fluid the mc is bad and needs rebuilt, or replaced.
That is the point I don't get either. How can zip tying overnight do anything. If the piston is holding the pressure, there can't be any opening beyond that for the air to escape the lines. The air would still be trapped in the lines.

Following proper bleeding procedure should get all of the air out of the lines.
 
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