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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,
While I do realize that this topic is quite controvercial, I have come across a new "method" for breaking in a new motorcycle. As you may or may not know, my 636 was stolen last month and I will be getting a new one next week. The following link is new to me, the theory sounds good to me, but i wanted to get another opinion from some people that know more about engines than i do.

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

Thank you for your opinions.

Mr. Speed
 

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Well, there are a TON of threads on this board on the proper break-in method, and the general consensus is that it is better to ignore the manufacturer's guidelines, and rev the bike constantly. Supposedly if you don't, the bike will never be fast. I would never break my bike in this way, but then again I'm not a hard rider. So, I guess if you're going to the track, or someplace that a tiny bit of power could mean the difference between 2nd and 1st place, I would break it in as harshly as possible. But on the streets I don't think you'll notice it if you follow the recommended procedure.
 

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I wouldn't say "harshly", but you do need to rev the engine. Don't redline it or even take it up to 11k rpm, but you need to vary the engine loads. Gradually increase the rpm range every time you ride, but remember to keep it rather low while cruising around. Quick bursts of acceleration are good. Don't lug the engine and don't use synthetic oil at all, you'll be fine.
 

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No matter what approach you take, the important thing is that you CONSTANTLY load and unload the motor for the first few hundrew miles. That is, don't keep the RPM's at the same speed all the time. Outside of that, I'm not going to get into it!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Haha, Thanks for the replies fellas, I am going to do just that, constantly load and unload the motor with quik burst of acceleration. My silver 636 that I bought in june I broke in per manufactures specs and I had no motor prolbems (or none that I knew of) for the 6,000miles that I rode it. Hopefully this is the right way casue I am one picky person about doing things the right way.

Mr. Speed
 

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Keep the needle dancing (up and down between gears, load on load off as SB suggests), and change the oil early to remove any metal shavings / bits in it. Those are the two key ingredients in my books, but as far as sticking to a planned break-in for rpm ranges to run, just gradually work up the revs - but I am not one to buy into the factory recommended procedure.

Check out this thread. Lots of good discussion on the subject.
 

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Here's the forum recommended break in: http://www.zx6r.com/breakinmain.html. I followed those steps and my bike makes 102.1 rear wheel horsepower (corrected).

A recent article in Performance Bikes (British motorcycle magazine) also talks about break in. They said the worst thing you can do to a new engine is lug it. In other words, following the manufacturers recomended break in is the worst thing for an engine. The only reason for the low RPM during break in is for liability reasons. If the factory did something wrong, they would rather see the engine blow up at a low speed. The chance of the rider getting hurt is reduced.

For comparison. The Honda recommended break in is "Avoid full throttle starts and rapid acceleration for the first 300 miles". There's no mention of limiting RPMs. I rode my 2002 CBR-954 above 5,000 RPM for the first 300 miles.

You can talk about this stuff forever and get lots of opinions. I believe in breaking them in hard, not abusing them, just rev them freely and never lug the engine.
 

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Does it really make that much of a difference? What the motorcycle magazines should do is take two identical bikes, and break them in two different ways. Dyno them before and after, and see the results. Then the myths and heresay would be buried forever.
 

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It would not work.

You would need the "before" dyno, because no two engines put out the same horsepower. But to do the dyno you would have to redline the pair, which would not follow the conservative procedure.
 

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Well, what are the "before" variances? If it's +/- 5hp then I'm sure it wouldn't make that big of a difference, would it?
 

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Originally posted by Blue636
Well, what are the "before" variances? If it's +/- 5hp then I'm sure it wouldn't make that big of a difference, would it?
If you do not think 5 hp is a big difference, then the experiment makes little sense. One break-in procedure will not gain a 110-hp engine 5 hp more than another break-in procedure, so you could break in the engine however you liked.

To properly determine the gain of a break-in procedure (or any change) on an engine, you need to dyno it before and after. But to properly dyno the engine before the break-in procedure, you have to redline it, which does not follow the break-in procedure (unless it is of the ride-it-like-you-stole-it variety and so hardly "break-in").

If it was that simple, there would be little controversy.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Wow, lots of interesting feedback. Theoretically two bikes should be the same, however i know that this is impossible. I think that doing diffrent breakin methods would be good but you would have to do it on multible bikes, say 10. 5 one way and 5 the other. I vow that If i ever have way too much money (which i plan to:D) I will do this and get the averages and see what is the best once and for all.

Mr. Speed
 

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Originally posted by Rob Lee
It would not work.

You would need the "before" dyno, because no two engines put out the same horsepower. But to do the dyno you would have to redline the pair, which would not follow the conservative procedure.
Well you could still do it after, and see what kind of horsepower it puts out, compared to the harder break in. Can two same model/year bikes vary that much in horesepower output?
 

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Say a bike puts out 107 hp off the floor. It is broken in using one procedure, and then puts out 108 hp. Another bike puts out 104 hp off the floor. It is broken in using another procedure, all else being equal, and then puts out 107 hp.

If you only dyno one bike before break-in, can you safely say that the procedure used for the higher-power bike after break-in gives the largest gain?

An engine is the sum of its parts, each of which has a standard of manufacture and a tolerance away from that standard. If many critical parts are away from the standard but within tolerance, the engine will give less power than it can with parts bang on the standard. A pair of seemingly identical production engines, each the sum of different parts, simply cannot put out the same power.

When an engine tuner blueprints an engine, a part can be replaced with a seemingly identical part that is closer to the standard. The engine, the sum of its parts, can then give much more power and still be legal in a form of racing that requires stock parts. Factory teams then often still have higher-horsepower engines because they have larger parts bins.
 

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Originally posted by NinjaRiderCan two same model/year bikes vary that much in horesepower output?
YES. I rode with a guy in 1996-97 who bought a '96 Ninja from the very same shipment to the same dealer with near identical serial numbers and right from the get-go the one I rode was miles better in straight line drags. The tolerances were apparently much better and at the valve clearance service which were done at nearly the same time with nearly the same mileage by the same mechanic, his service required a lot more work than mine. Even after this service was completed, mine was able to consistently leave him in a straight line, even when we swapped bikes. Not STAGGERING I suppose, but still more than enough proof that two identical bikes CAN produce a good variance in power output.

You also don't have to read many magazine articles and shootouts to find one in which they refer to "finding a strong model" or came particularly "strong from the factory".
 
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