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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I want to get a small scooter and get my license that way, instead of via an MSF. I'm thinking those tiny Hondas or something. Then later on, I'll get my MSF for my own benefit and graduate to a sportbike.

Now, how hard is the riding test given by the DMV? What do they demand? How easy is it to pass?

Cheers!
 

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lol i just rented a scooter off craigslist chick met me at the DMV i passed got my M class rode my bike. lol i tried to make my own mock course and use my bike even went after hours to the DMV its just not really possible. i mean its possible. but its not probable. my buddy came with me and actually had to set down his bike. was at a complete stop and there was no damage done but still, you get the point....
 

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Hey guys,

I want to get a small scooter and get my license that way, instead of via an MSF. I'm thinking those tiny Hondas or something. Then later on, I'll get my MSF for my own benefit and graduate to a sportbike.

Now, how hard is the riding test given by the DMV? What do they demand? How easy is it to pass?

Cheers!
Lord protect us from the newbees.

First off you are going to pay as much or more for a "name" brand scooter as you will for a used 250 bike. All the major brands make 250's that will fill your need Honda and Suzuki have a "cruiser" style but most of the folks you will run into on KF will point you towards a Ninja 250. For the same amount of money for the scooter you can have your sport bike.

You don't say where you are from so no idea what the DMV test will be like. From the "cheers" sounds like you may not me in the states but. . . In my state if you go to the local DMV for an M license they have a course for you to ride and they really try to fail you. A lot of people go to some of the small towns around where they just follow you in a car. The catch-22 is you can get a "learners permit" for a motorcycle but you have to have a M licensed rider with you so logistics gets to be a problem.

GO TAKE THE MSF!!! Prices vary but the $$ are well worth it. The only thing you need to provide is high top boots/shoes, long sleved shirt/jacket and gloves. Some provide a helment but I'd bring my own if I were you. What you will learn is far beyond what you will learn on your own. Unless you like learning from the school of hard knocks - and on a bike that can be painful and expensive. With an MSF certificate no hassle at DMS just show and go and insurance companies usually give a discount for MSF.

If you want to go shopping for used 250's let me know and I'll point you to some good threads/sources on how to check a bike out and what you are really getting into.

Think twice about your stated course of action . . . please.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Lord protect us from the newbees.

First off you are going to pay as much or more for a "name" brand scooter as you will for a used 250 bike. All the major brands make 250's that will fill your need Honda and Suzuki have a "cruiser" style but most of the folks you will run into on KF will point you towards a Ninja 250. For the same amount of money for the scooter you can have your sport bike.

You don't say where you are from so no idea what the DMV test will be like. From the "cheers" sounds like you may not me in the states but. . . In my state if you go to the local DMV for an M license they have a course for you to ride and they really try to fail you. A lot of people go to some of the small towns around where they just follow you in a car. The catch-22 is you can get a "learners permit" for a motorcycle but you have to have a M licensed rider with you so logistics gets to be a problem.

GO TAKE THE MSF!!! Prices vary but the $$ are well worth it. The only thing you need to provide is high top boots/shoes, long sleved shirt/jacket and gloves. Some provide a helment but I'd bring my own if I were you. What you will learn is far beyond what you will learn on your own. Unless you like learning from the school of hard knocks - and on a bike that can be painful and expensive. With an MSF certificate no hassle at DMS just show and go and insurance companies usually give a discount for MSF.

If you want to go shopping for used 250's let me know and I'll point you to some good threads/sources on how to check a bike out and what you are really getting into.

Think twice about your stated course of action . . . please.
I prefer my route.

I love that everyone is talking shit but no one is answering my question.
 

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I love that everyone is talking shit but no one is answering my question.
Man you have got a severe case of optical-rectumitis. If you consider the responses to be "talking" shit, standby. People are trying to give you input based upon experience.

As for people not answering your question

Now, how hard is the riding test given by the DMV? What do they demand? How easy is it to pass?
Cheers!
you still haven't told us where you are located. Every DMV is different and as I tried to point out even in my state it varies by town.

You can take or leave the advice that is offered but lose the attitude or you are going to find it very lonely on the forum.
 
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Seriously, you have to be joking, right?

Now, in the state of Michigan, your CY endorsement is for both scooter and motorcycle. For all intents and purposes of Secretary of State, a scooter is a motorcycle.

Now then, how tough varies by state, and then by testing agency. Some states, you take the MSF, and you don't have to take the DMV test (such as Michigan).

If you are intent on taking it on a scooter, a poster above suggested renting one, or, I would also say borrow one from a friend. I know a person or two who has done that. Thought about doing it myself, but took the MSF instead. No reason to buy a scooter just to sell it.
 

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Not true. An 80cc bike qualifies as a motorcycle.
While in some states/places it technically does but it's far from highway legal, nor would any sane person have any glimpse of a dream of riding it on one.

I prefer my route.

I love that everyone is talking shit but no one is answering my question.
Your way would work but honestly it sucks. You'll have a license but no experience on a real bike, I'm guessing this is where the MSF later comes in. Test wise, if you fail whatever standard motorcycle test they have for a 500 or less cc motorcycle while riding a 80cc automagic scooter your really bad and probably never had a two-wheel bicycle as a kid. I know a guy that did the test on a rental scooter, he said it was really easy.
 

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Hey guys,

I want to get a small scooter and get my license that way, instead of via an MSF. I'm thinking those tiny Hondas or something. Then later on, I'll get my MSF for my own benefit and graduate to a sportbike.

Now, how hard is the riding test given by the DMV? What do they demand? How easy is it to pass?

Cheers!
I just finished the MSF course and I asked the instructors about the regular DMV test. The response was that it's easy if you know what they are asking you to do. There is some basic terminolgy you have to be clear on so you know what they are asking you to do. If you do, it's a no-brainer. I'm not sure why you would want it to be easy. I'd prefer to know wtf I'm doing than to get an easy license and end up getting hurt.
 

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From what I've heard from riders in my area, our DMV is really lazy and they basically just let you make 4 right turns in the parking lot and bam, you're a licensed motorcyclist. Could be why I turned on the news today and heard about yet another rider killing himself on the interstate this morning.

I'll go with everyone else here and advise the MSF course. Or if you're crazy/stupid like me you can buy the bike first, teach yourself to ride it around the neighborhood for a month or two, and then go for a license. I don't think the scooter approach is a good idea at all. And it's kind of pointless. The jump from scooter to sportbike is about the same as the jump from bicycle to sportbike. Except the bicycle puts down more torque and is easier to turn :D
 

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I've put on 1,000 miles on my bike (250R) and am only now going to consider the road test this coming Tuesday. If you think you should take it on an 80cc scooter, I have to agree with the other posters, what's the point?

I would have signed up for the MSF course if the nearest one in NY wasn't 2 hours away, and horrible timing for course dates.
 

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There is always something new you can learn at the MSF course, whether your a new rider or experienced. I think it is worth it, but if you want to know more about the DMV test, you can find videos of it on youtube if you search for it. Again the MSF course is excellent and well worth it.
 

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to clarify my last post about how i did it, the MSF courses around here are FREE and fill up within the first half hour usualyl of being posted back in february or whenever they come out. so getting into one is very very lucky, however if anyone is late and you show up you can take their spot, but once again its luck. i definatly think you should take the MSF its the best and should be teh only way to get a license BUT needs to be offered in more abundance so it can hold the demands of the amount of people that want to take it. i however didnt have a bike nor plans to own one back in feb so in order to ride legally (thanks to work and school i couldnt fit in an all weekend 22 hour course if i did get lucky enough to show up at one and someone was late) i had to use a 150cc scooter (here 150 and up is m-class anything below is an L class) to pass it and had plenty of on road practice with experienced friends as well as my previous riding experience though not a super bike up to todays standards (all dirt bikes occasionally a new sport bike when a friend allowed and my old early 90's ZX6). thats why i did it that route. not the best but in my case the only way. now i did intend to do it on my bike but after doing it on my buddy's scooter (practice run not the actual test yet) it was pretty tight on that, i then tried it on my bike and i would have hit the last two cones in the slalom and doubt i would have passed the swerve test. now in my other argument 80% of my states test is manuevering at 5mph.... honestly, thats NOT going to help me on the streets unless i happen to find myself in a small alley litered with obstacles.... so in actuallity the DMV test is just a joke and should have a more real world approach or just get rid of it and like i said bring in more MSF courses. i wish i could have taken one but luck wasnt on my side, maybe i'll take the experienced riders course next year or something. we will see.


summary, take the MSF, and there are ones hosted here by harley davidson and crap that cost money but from all my research it was held through a different organization and wouldnt have given me my license once finished with it all. i thought it would have but as far as my research could pull up the DMV wouldnt have accepted it as a substitute for their MSF course/dmv "road" test
 

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i then tried it on my bike and i would have hit the last two cones in the slalom and doubt i would have passed the swerve test. now in my other argument 80% of my states test is manuevering at 5mph.... honestly, thats NOT going to help me on the streets unless i happen to find myself in a small alley litered with obstacles.... so in actuallity the DMV test is just a joke and should have a more real world approach or just get rid of it and like i said bring in more MSF courses.
With more practice the slalom should be doable.

If you can't swerve you can't ride PERIOD

Slow riding not gonna help you? So when your stopping once your below 15-20 mph (or whatever speed it is for you) you have no control over the bikes direction, nor do you need it? Guess you never miss a turn and need to make u-turns.

It may not seem real world but all bikes ride in or pass through the speed that they have you doing parking lot maneuvers in. Riding fast and straight is easy, the bike doesn't even need the rider to do so, so they aren't gonna test your control of the bike in a condition where you don't even have to be on the bike. I know alot of people here like to practice corners, apexes, and draggin knee like it's important but unlike the DMV tests a rider CAN go through life without knowing corners, how to hang off, and riding at fast speed. No rider can ride without being in or passing through the speed zone the dmv tests you at and below 20 straight only doesn't cut it.
 
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