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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Part #39067

http://www.mrcycles.com/fiche_image...i&category=Motorcycles&dc=792&name=Oil+Cooler

That's the oil cooler. I pierced it by attempting to remove my oil filter by hammering a screw driver through it to use as a lever (it worked, btw). I tried this because I stripped the bolt on the back of the K&N oil filter and I couldn't remove it with a wrench nor my mitts.

So yeah, I fucked up real bad on a simple oil change.

Do you guys think using JB weld would patch it up? It says it's good to go on engine blocks and radiators up to 600 degrees F. Would I need to drain the coolant (I assume so because it's dripping about 1 drop per 3 seconds)?
:confused::dunno:
 

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Do the JB weld, it should work fine but I would only use it for a temp fix until you have the time or can afford to replace the cooler with a new one. Clean the are as best you can using brake cleaner and then apply the JB weld. Let it dry overnight and then check for leaks again, applying as needed until it doesn't leak any more. Replace the cooler as soon as you can.
 

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large channel locking pliers or oil filter pliers next time are a better choise for removing the filter. screwdriver is absolute last resort. if you cant remove the filter by hand... it was installed too tight. filter only needs to get on just past the point where the o ring seats. i wouldent bother with the JB just replace the thing. get a new seal between the cooler and block too
 

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Wait to get a new one, I wouldn't want a coolant leak to spring up mid corner.
 

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Oh, for getting off oil filters, I've always used a wrap of sandpaper, provides the necessary friction required to get off even the most ham-fisted installed oil filters.

Ethan
 

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Doesn't the K&N filter have a hext bolt head molded on it so you could use one of those socket adapters to spin it off? I generally use a pair of large pliers, off and on with no issues.
 

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My son did this to my bike when I had 100 miles on it. Didn't use JB Weld but something similar. It held fine until I replaced the cooler at the first service. They are $300 to $400 bucks! Go to www.babbittsonline.com for a new one.
 

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I got one off ebay for $120 with the fan. Works perfectly. You could also get someone that welds aluminum patch the hole. I have my old one sitting in my garage. It still has a couple of holes in it but you can have it for $50.
 

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cheapcycleparts.com

Replace that thing, Sorry but I'm not trusting my motor or traction to JB. It's good stuff but I'm just sayin'....
 

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filter only needs to get on just past the point where the o ring seats.
plus about 1/8 / 1/4 turn to make it snug. but not tight. then safety wire it, and you will never ever have to lose sleep over it again.

safety wire is note required, but i do it anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
If anyone runs into this problem in the future, I just want to make it known that I've been riding a few days and the JB Weld job on my oil cooler has held up perfectly fine. I'm so glad too because I just saved myself at least $350-$450 on a new oil cooler by just using some JB Weld and my time. This is also a good idea to change the spark plugs, clean/replace the air filter, or do any other maintainance that needs to be done.

What you will need to fix your pierced oil cooler:
JB Weld
3 gallons of distilled water (for flushing the cooling system)
New coolant of your choice (I used Prestone 50/50) (make sure it's aluminum safe, most are)

Highly recommended:
Service Manual

Useful tips:

1. Drain as much coolant as possible before attempting to JB weld the hole. I tried to slap a big glob of JB Weld on the oil cooler leak while it was still dripping once every 3 seconds, but there was just no way.

2. The hole needs to be as dry as possible for the weld to cure, so get a hair dryer and cut out the bottom of a water bottle. Stick the water bottle in the radiator filler neck (where the radiator cap goes) to use it as a funnel for the air blowing from the hair dryer (a regular funnel is too short, you'd have to remove the front cowling to reach the radiator cap without the water bottle). This will blow out much more coolant much more quickly. Leave a gap between the dryer and the bottle though or it will make the dryer's safety mechanism shut it off (I shoved the dryer in the water bottle and it quickly over-heated and then I had to wait a long time for it to turn on again).

3. You still may not get all the coolant out, but when the dripping from the oil cooler is very slow (one drip per 20-30 seconds or more) then go ahead and mix up a good amount of JB weld. However, let it cure before applying for at least 45 minutes to 1 hour if there is still any coolant dripping so that the mixture will be thick enough not to run off. Then apply a good amount all over the hole. For me, the JB weld would slide down a little bit, but by taking a spoon and smearing it back up ever 45 minutes or so for a few hours, eventually it was able to hold it's own weight and cure. I waited a good 20 hours before flushing the cooling system to make sure it was fully cured.

4. If you're adding a different coolant, or if the coolant you drained was old (both were true for me) then you would definitely want to flush the cooling system a number of times with distilled water before adding in the new coolant. Another reason for flusing the cooling system is that when applying the JB Weld, some of it sure made it inside, and thus you'll have JB Weld particles floating around in there like I did. I flushed the cooling system about 5-6 times with the 3 gallons of distilled water. By the last flushing, there were virtually no particles or old coolant left and the water come out clear. To make flushing go by as quickly as possible, fill it through the radiator filler neck up to the top with the distilled water. Also make sure you took out the old coolant from the coolant reserve tank (under the fuel tank) and flushed that out with distilled water (I only needed to do this once). After the distilled water is all in there, turn the bike on and let it heat up to 150ish. That's just hot enough not to burn you and not to have to wait for the bike to cool down in order to drain the distilled water out right away. Make sure you catch some of the draining liquid because you'll want to check it after each flushing to see how many particles you may have still flowing around in there. After it's all drained, plug the drain bolts back up and add more distilled water. Repeat the process until there is no more JB Weld particles left in the drainage and the water is clear.

Well, there you have it. I know it's a lot of reading, but it's actually really really simple. I just wanted to put down every detail I learned just in case it helps anyone out in the future. Totally worth the savings of $350-$450 on a new oil cooler.

To sum it all up:
1. Dry out the cooling system as much as possible.
2. Apply 45 min slightly pre-cured JB Weld.
3. Re-smear JB Weld upwards every 45 minutes if it keeps sliding down until it's hard.
4. Let cure for 15-20 hours.
5. Flush cooling system 5-6 times with distilled water until water runs clear and free of particles.
6. Apply coolant of your choice (I used Prestone 50/50).

Remember, I'm not responsible if this doesn't work or if anything unwanted or unexpected happens! Just use common sense and good luck. Peace.
 

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