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picked up my new red zx6r yesterday. Upgrade from an sv650s. Sa weet....
i am so excited but the bummer is that spring is a long ways away here in MN. Guess i hope for snow so the sled can get some miles on it. ZX6r will just have to sit on the powerstands waiting til snow is gone....
i have a question tho...no that it matters right now..but the owners manual and sticker on bike says to stay below 6000rpms during the first 1000 miles. Mechanic at dealer said that a flat spot might develop if break in is not followed correctly. The break-in article on this forum says much different. How do i break it in? 1000 miles under 6K will be tough wont it???
Thanks in advance...love my new bike......saaaaawweeeetttttt

 

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1000 miles at under 6 k will not only be tough, it'll be freakin' impossible. Use your head and keep the rpms unde 6 for a couple hundred miles but no highway droning. Vary your rpm's and load conditions (without lugging the motor) for 4 or 500 miles and gradually increase from there.
Cheers, lee S.
 

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Follow this. One big thing is to get that oil changed quick before you put too many miles on it.

The key word is "slowly" bringing the RPM's up. Don't go around nailing it until it's broke in.

There is also prob 100 posts (no joke) on break-in experiences here. Search the tech tips and help forum, and, oddly, the off-topic discussion.
 

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I've got something completely different to add to this discussion.
On one of the other forums I frequent, I recently came across a similiar thread, and one person posted a link that goes directly to a airplane engine manufacturers website, and it details how the engine manufacturer recommends that their engines be properly broken in.

Here's a breakdown of what was recommended by the airplane engine manufacturer:

The first insitial break in is done at the factory, and involves seating the piston rings during a 1 hour initial run in, where the engine is run at 50-75% maximum rpms, varying the throttle position from 100% down to 50% openings after every 15 minutes. Oil is then changed, filter is changed, valve clearances are re-inspected.

Engine is installed in the plane, and during the first 10 hours of engine run time, they recommend 100% throttle at take off, and to vary the rpms between 65-85% of maximum rpms. After 10 hours, change the oil and filter again, re-inspect valve clearances, and use the engine as you will for the rest of its useful life.

Now, how important do you think it is that an airplane engine is properly broken in? I would say pretty high. So next bike is going to be broken in just like that.

BC.
 

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Here's a thread we often link to when discussing break in procedures. My own personal train of thought is along the lines of the one Gary linked to that Rob Lee posted. It's a little more gradual than the Motoman shpeel, but still allows the engine to break in quickly and not bore the rider to death with endless low-rpm runs.

It's a discussion as I've said that will never have a unanimous agreement from everybody.
 

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Originally posted by bladecutter
I've got something completely different to add to this discussion.
On one of the other forums I frequent, I recently came across a similiar thread, and one person posted a link that goes directly to a airplane engine manufacturers website, and it details how the engine manufacturer recommends that their engines be properly broken in.

Here's a breakdown of what was recommended by the airplane engine manufacturer:

The first insitial break in is done at the factory, and involves seating the piston rings during a 1 hour initial run in, where the engine is run at 50-75% maximum rpms, varying the throttle position from 100% down to 50% openings after every 15 minutes. Oil is then changed, filter is changed, valve clearances are re-inspected.

Engine is installed in the plane, and during the first 10 hours of engine run time, they recommend 100% throttle at take off, and to vary the rpms between 65-85% of maximum rpms. After 10 hours, change the oil and filter again, re-inspect valve clearances, and use the engine as you will for the rest of its useful life.

Now, how important do you think it is that an airplane engine is properly broken in? I would say pretty high. So next bike is going to be broken in just like that.

BC.
While that is an interesting read, it has nothing to do with a car/bike engine.

The engines work totally differently then eachother, whether its a jet engine or a prop engine, they are very different then a car/bike engine, other then the odd guy with a homebuilt ultra-light [8D]
 

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hypotheticals abound.....

do whatever makes you "feel" better...I don't think there's too much at stake as long as you:

1. don't act like an idiot
2. vary rpms

The only thing I was scared of making sure I used every bit of each gear little by little
 

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It would take a while to find. If I remember to do it, i'll post the link.
It was about 4 cyle piston engines, not jet engines.
All 4 cycle piston engines work in similiar ways. Execution from one engine to the next may not be identical, but they are similiar enough to offer benifits from their break in techniques if we use them.

The engines work in exactly the same way, the transmission of power to the turned object, however, is entirely different. How the poerwed object then interacts with the vehicle is entirely different, but the motors operate the same.

A starter motor turns a flywheel attached directly to the crankshaft. Crankshaft journals push a set of pistons, via connecting rods up and down in cylindrical bores. The pistons are mostly sealed to the bores via metal rings. As the piston travels up, everything between the piston crown and the cylinder head is either compressed, or expelled through an exhaust port. If the piston travels down with an intake port open, a vacuum is created, pulling fresh fuel/air mixture into the chamber. The intake and exhaust valves are opened and closed via a camshaft, which is directly attached either through gears or a chain to the crankshaft.

Those are the basic ingredients of a 4 cycle engine. There are differences in valvetrain components, piston shapes, intake/exhaust port shapes, runner/header lengths, vacuum/forced induction components, and other things, but there will always be pistons, crankshafts, camshafts, valves, and sealing rings. Those are the main components that need to be broken in properly, and they all get broken in exactly the same way... By being operated in a way that will not stress them too much until they heat cycle into a harmonious shape in relation to each other.

BC.
 

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A bike mag here in the UK did a comparison in methods a while ago using two GSXR 600s. One was run in according to manufacturers recommendation and another was nailed from the git go. They then stripped then down and analysed them after piling some more miles on.

The conclusion was that the nailed bike was quicker but would need a costly rebuild at about 35k miles. The manufacturers rec bike was slower, (and we're only talking about 5 mph or so here) but would probably go to 60/70k before needing any engine rework.
 

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Originally posted by Galloper

The conclusion was that the nailed bike was quicker but would need a costly rebuild at about 35k miles. The manufacturers rec bike was slower, (and we're only talking about 5 mph or so here) but would probably go to 60/70k before needing any engine rework.
That's why breaking in a racebike seems to be a bit different than breaking in your streetbike. Racebikes get rebuilds anyway and maximizing power is key element...
 

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"A bike mag here in the UK did a comparison in methods a while ago using two GSXR 600s. One was run in according to manufacturers recommendation and another was nailed from the git go. They then stripped then down and analysed them after piling some more miles on.

The conclusion was that the nailed bike was quicker but would need a costly rebuild at about 35k miles. The manufacturers rec bike was slower, (and we're only talking about 5 mph or so here) but would probably go to 60/70k before needing any engine rework."


Man i would love to see this issue...This would without a doubt end any debate...I would go for longer engine life on a street bike without a doubt....
 
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