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So, I hit a pothole/bump in the road and bent the piss out of my rear wheel a while back. I finally got my hands on a new rear-wheel with the tire and sprocket already mounted.
Is there anything special I need to know to take the back wheel out? I've never done this before, so some pointers would be appreciated.
 

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Nothing hard about getting it out. But going back is a real pain you will need 2 people as getting the wheel and brake caliper in and lined up on the perch will be a bit of work. Just make sure you line everything up and if your smart you may want to get a micrometer to measure your rod after you slide it back in and make sure its perfectly straight. Yes there are guide marks on the side of the swingarm but im anal about how straight it is when you tighten everything down. Dont forget how the spacers go back in also. Your clearances are real close between the swingarm so just go slow. And make sure you have plenty of slack in the chain, Slack in the chain is good better ability for suspension flex.
 

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I was abe to do it myself with my rear stand but it took multiple tries and about 30 mins. to get everything lined up right. If you can get a 2nd person to help out it should be pretty easy. If you don't have a rear stand you can still do it with the bike tilted on the kickstand. You'd deffinantly need a 2nd person for this.
 

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Yeh, you can do it yourself ( if you have rear stand ). It'd be faster to have a buddy to help you, but you'll be allright by yourself as well. Just remember where and how the spacers go and stuff.
 

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Originally posted by MANSON6
Nothing hard about getting it out. But going back is a real pain you will need 2 people as getting the wheel and brake caliper in and lined up on the perch will be a bit of work.
Not exactly sure what Manson6 means in the above statement as the rear caliper should be removed before the wheel comes off and reinstalled after the wheel is mounted. You may struggle a little with the caliper mounting bracket at first but once you get the axle through that it's a piece of cake. The first time can be a PITA but it doesn't take 2 people if you have a stand. As stated above the clearance is very tight and your spacers will probably fall out a few time till you get it right. I use the white lithium grease on my axle. As for the guide marks for the chain adjustment, yes they can be off. I don't have a micrometer so I count the number of threads showing in the adjuster bolt. Should be equal, right? Oh yea, when you get the chain slack where you want it, it will tighten when you torque down the axle nut. You either have to leave a little extra slack in the chain which will tighten back up when you tighten the nut OR you can run a wrench or broom handle or something throught the swing arm into the rear sprocket to prevent the wheel from moving. Then when you torque down the axle nut it will not cause the chain to tighten from where you have it set. Neat little trick my mechanic showed me. Save me much time in having to keep going back to adjust and readjust the slack til I got it just right. In fact that used to be the longest part of the job for me cuz I'm anal about it too. Good luck
 
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