Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I'm no technical expert but I do know not to go by the marks on the swing arm. It sounds to me that you may have a big tight spot on your chain. If this is the case no amount of adjustment will cure it, only a new chain. This is where the chain has streached in an un-even way (probably from the previous owner if it was tight when you got it).

Remember to check to tension with the bike sitting normally (not on a paddock stand) and at the tightest spot on the chain.

Hope this helps,

Hugh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
If there was a tight spot on the chain, wouldn't you be able to pick it when free spinning the rear wheeel?

I've had it on a paddock stand and spun the wheel. There is one point where there is a tiny bit of resistance, but I can't see how that would make the current racket my bike is making. The chain makes absolutely no sound when you spin the wheel freely.

I really don't want to go and get a new chain as the bike has only done 3,500 miles and the chain should still be ok, shouldn't it?

Next step is removing the chain for a good clean, lube and thorough checkover. Or am I wasting my time?


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
No, it does not sound like a tight spot, you would pick it up on the paddock stand, so don't go and but a new chain.

Obvious questions: -

Is the chain well lubed
Are there teeth worn on the front sprocket (or rear)
Do you feel vibration through the pegs
Is there a dry link on the chain that causes a kink

I have a J2 with 5500 miles and we have to look after our chains here in Scotland coz of the salt on the roads put down during the winter. My chain is in good shape, but past bikes that have seen more of winter conditions have not been so clever.

The last thing that I can think (I said that I was not too technical) is if the last owner kept the chain really tight and drove reasonable hard, there may be damamge to the bearing on the output shaft that the front sprocket is attached to.

Sorry I can't help more and I hope you get it fixed. Please update the site when you get to the root of the problem.

Hugh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Don't know if this would do anything or not, but have somebody follow you down the rode and watch your back tire. If it is bent/ crooked, you can usually see the tire spin sort of funny. Good Luck

Jeremy 99 ZX6-R
Look ma, I can ride a two wheeler!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
stupid question, when was the last time you clean and lubed your chain? i had the same probably a few months ago during the winter, I would put the bike on a rear stand and put the bike in gear and let the rear tire spin.

the chain would slap around all over the place. after cleaning and lubing the chain for like the next 2 days, the problem went away and my chain rolls smoothly throughout the whole chain
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,606 Posts
Forget about the length of the bolts. Unless you have other methods available to you use the marks on the swingarm. According to your photo you are badly off. No wonder the chain is making weird noises.

Move the wheel forward loosening the chain until you get just a tad (technical language) forward of the same mark on both sides and then using the bolt get it exactly on the same mark on both sides. Then turn the bolts the same number of turns on each side to tension the chain. Go slow because you don't want to have to back up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Howdy people, I could really use some help.

Quick background info before the real problem:

My 2000 J1 '6R has been making a noise from the chain. It seems like the chain is either hitting on the plastic guide occasionally or the chain is nearly missing the front sprocket tooth and slipping back off, but it sounds like metal on plastic (maybe). It's hard to tell as it only happens once I get rolling at around 10 mph or more, then it becomes hard to hear the sound. It doesn't make the sound when rolling slowly (slower than walking pace) in neutral.

Now.....

We originally thought it was the chain tightness (it was too tight when I bought it) so we backed the chain off a bit. When we tightened the wheel nut, we used the marks on the swingarm as the guide to make sure it was even.

The bike still made the sound so I took it by the local shop and asked for their advice. They said just keep toying with the adjustments as it sounded like an alignment problem. They also said to use the number of threads on the adjustment bolts as the measurement, not the marks on the swingarm.

So today I did just that. I adusted the chain again and made the adjustment bolts the same (see pics below). The first pic is the left side and the second is the right. "A" is the adjustment bolt and above "B" are the marks on the frame.





As you can see, the bolts are the same distance (I measured them) but now the marks on the frame are different.

The bike now makes even more noise from the chain and I'm not sure if it was the wind and rain today, but I reckon the bike felt wierd to ride. I'm not sure what I mean by that, but it didn't appear to be as stable as usual, but again may have been the weather and wet roads. What's the best way to tell if the wheel is true and straight? A visual spinning of the wheel, a rig at a shop, or some other way?

I'd really appreciate any advice anyone could give me about the correct adjustment measurements

Cheers

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
I just did the same thing on my '02. I was using calipers to measure the distance A and noticed that the swingarm is different depending on the side. I estimated using the hash marks then set up some string around the front wheel and fairing to check the alignment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,691 Posts
Here's a simple check for alignment... straighten out the front wheel so it's perfectly centered... now take a couple long STRAIGHT items (rebar or true plywood edges or steel edging... just something perfectly straight and longer than the bike...

Get the bike upright (someone hold it or on a rear stand). Align the straight pieces on each side of the rear tire, so it is touching a spot on the front of the tire and on the back, against the sidewall, and facing forward and around the front tire. If the wheel is aligned properly, the straight edges will run past the front tire and not touch it, but maintain equal distance away from the thinner front tire sidewalls, on either side.

It's an old, not very scientific method, but hey, it's a check...

"Keep yer feet on the pegs and your right hand cranked."
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top