Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i wanna repaint my 2001 zx6r a nw color...any suggestions on brand,type, or grade of paint...can i use regular car paint...do i need undercoat,primer,clearoat???thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
well, it depends on if you are going a whole new color or what. if you are changing the base color I prefer to take it down to the metal/plastic and then primer (if needed) and then paint it, but some people dont like to take those steps. if you dont want to do that then sand it down a bit get a good texture on the clear that is on there so the paint will stick, srpay the paint on top of the other base and then reclear it, wet sand the clear and tehn another 2-3 coats of clear. that is what I do. OH I use house of colors paint when ever I can, it has worked best for me but it also depends on what exact color you are going for. But car paint is what you should use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
I've changed colors twice already on my 636. I pay between 130-160 for the paint and additives. The sanding you could do your self with like a 300 grit. I dont really know what it would cost to get it done because mine gets done for free. Guessing prob. $350 or so if you take off the plastics yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
“How much it costs” varies significantly. Understand a fair portion of paint work involves labor: proper preparation is essential for jobs that don’t look like some doofus and a can of Rustoleum met up one night.

At a gunshow recently, I met a guy who custom-engraves firearms. His work starts at $2,500 and really has no top limit, depending on amount of time it’ll take. When done, the pieces are museum-quality. He’s an artist. A collector could not touch an original Chagall, Matisse, or van Gogh for less than several million dollars these days. Vehicle paint work’s not dissimilar, albeit on a different scale: good work costs money. Shit work costs three hundred bucks at Maico.

Most people recognize the difference between van Gogh and Maico, so to speak, so the limit’s really how much time, effort, and money you’re willing to spend.

Here’s an example: I have grunge race bodywork for my ’03. I stripped the existing bogus paint job with a portable sander & 100 grit, plus methylene chloride paint remover. Now I’ll finish the prep with 400 grit and a sanding block, by hand. That’ll take me all day Sunday, most likely.

When ready, I’ll blow PJ1 primer, wet-sand, maybe a little more primer, wet-sand again with 1000 and 2000 grit, then on goes PJ1 black paint. Finally I’ll try some PJ1 clear-coat. The PJ1’s rattle-can, but supposedly a decent paint for the money. I’m no painting expert, but know my ass from 100-grit at least.

For a rattle-can job on race bodywork, it should look OK. I doubt I’ll win any craftsmanship prizes. Total cost in supplies: about seventy-five bucks, including the portable sander (a reusable item). Total cost in my time: about 16 hours. Quality of job: marginal, but not horrid. I don’t really care, and know going in what I’ll end up with coming out.

On the other hand, a guy around these parts paints motorcycle bodywork on the cheap (relatively speaking). Drop a set off, he’ll paint it quite well for roughly seven to nine hundred bucks, depending on preparation time. That includes prep time, primer, paint, and clear-coat. I’ve seen a lot of his work; it’s quite good for the money. To be clear, however, the job isn’t factory-quality: just “very good.” There is a big difference.

I had some Ducati bodywork painted in 1993. The guy who ran the shop, Kirk, matched the Ducati red very well. He painted two side panels and the front (headlight) piece for seven hundred bucks. I did most of the prep work beforehand, however: if I hadn’t, add five hundred in labor (1993 dollars, too). The job was almost factory-quality. In fact most people never knew different. In retrospect I did fairly well.

Then in 2000, I spec’d out a bike-repaint job with a guy around here known for true artistry. His work wins prizes. A two-tone job, all pieces unprepped with a little body filling, started at $2,500. While a lot of money, that’s about what I expected. Add cute Arlan Ness –esque graphics and similar, or multiple layers of paint and clear-coat, the price goes up significantly. There’s that “artistry” thing again, and artists get paid. Surf the Troy Lee Designs helmet painting pages for other examples of awesome paint work at equally awesome prices. Quality is seldom, if ever, cheap.

You’ve probably seen decent, but not factory-quality, paint jobs on various used bikes. The surface isn’t as “deep,” there might be a few cracks and some orange-peel, espeically if it’s an older job. Cheaper jobs tend to dull after a few years and don’t stand exposure to the elements terribly well. Again: depends what you want.

Hope that helps.

-=DRB=-
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top