Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
ill be honest, i didnt even think if trying to search it.
 

·
Neutered
2006 MV Agusta F4 1000S
Joined
·
8,866 Posts
I use it on my 636, and it's really nice. I don't ever have to think about getting an oil filter. Just get the oil and a thing of brake cleaner. Spray it down once you have it apart, let it air dry, then put it back together and prime it, and you're good to go. Really convenient, and it has a magnet built into it to catch the metal bits. And it has the oil filter wrench beveling and comes with the right size socket. I have over 20k miles on my 636 running the Scott's filter, and I haven't had any issues at all relating to impure oil. Compression is still perfect across the board, power is as strong as ever...to me it's worth the convenience and the savings in buying multiple oil filters. Obviously, you'd have to have the filter for 10 or 15 oil changes to repay what you spent in money alone, but if you change your oil every 1,500 to 3k miles like you should, and you're not a squid and dump your bike, you should be able to reach that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
571 Posts
If Scotts would stick a nut with a safety wire hole or something else on the end so it could be safety wired I think it would be a fabulous option. It would only take me 8 oil changes to start saving money on not having to buy an oil filter each time. But without a convenient way to safety wire it I'll stick to my K&N oil filters. I know, I know, I could wrap a hose clamp around it. But why would I pay $120 for a bling'd oil filter to slap a hose clamp around it?
 

·
Neutered
2006 MV Agusta F4 1000S
Joined
·
8,866 Posts
Originally posted by kpt4321



Don't you think changing your oil every 1500 miles is pushing it just a little bit?
If you use synthetic, yes. But organic or semi-synthetic oil will break down faster in a high-compression high revving engine. So it's up to you. If you only keep your bike for a few seasons and buy a new one, then it really doesn't matter. Also, if you're racing a lot, you'll definately want to change your oil much more frequently.
 

·
Neutered
2006 MV Agusta F4 1000S
Joined
·
8,866 Posts
Originally posted by ninjakid04636
just for piece of mind, i prefer replacing my filters at every oil change
The whole point is that the Scott's is laser-perforated stainless steel filter medium, versus paper glued to cardboard that Fram uses (it's -literally- paper glued to cardboard...take a Fram filter apart sometime). With the laser perforated SS mesh, all the filter holes are exactly the same diameter, so it doesn't lose filter efficiency when some holes get clogged with smaller particles (paper filters lose efficiency because the holes are organic and non-uniform in size, and the smallest holes get clogged with filtered particles first, leaving only larger holes for the oil to filter through, which allows more and more larger particles through as time goes on). So...It's good for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
mabe yall can explain this to me. the filter has a strong magnet inside of it,(or so im told). what does this pick up. that a magnetic drain plug wont. it double security, but im curoius. my other question, is that there is a bypass valve in the motor so that if the oil has i hard time getting through the oil filter, it can bypass it and that way the motor wont be starved for oil. do these filters seem to get cloged easier, faster, etc. so that the oil ends up going throught the bypass? it would seem that this could be an issue since it is suposed to let less particals through. and lastly, has anyone ever heard of one of these filters getting messed up, like where the filter its self got dammaged. like the mesh inside got torn?
 

·
Neutered
2006 MV Agusta F4 1000S
Joined
·
8,866 Posts
Originally posted by helo-pilot
mabe yall can explain this to me. the filter has a strong magnet inside of it,(or so im told). what does this pick up. that a magnetic drain plug wont. it double security, but im curoius. my other question, is that there is a bypass valve in the motor so that if the oil has i hard time getting through the oil filter, it can bypass it and that way the motor wont be starved for oil. do these filters seem to get cloged easier, faster, etc. so that the oil ends up going throught the bypass? it would seem that this could be an issue since it is suposed to let less particals through. and lastly, has anyone ever heard of one of these filters getting messed up, like where the filter its self got dammaged. like the mesh inside got torn?
I've never heard of the mesh getting damaged...it's pretty frickin beefy. As for clogging up...the Scotts filter has more filter holes than a standard paper filter, because the holes are smaller, on average. So if the filter will get clogged, a paper filter would clog first. As long as you clean it right, it's completely unclogged and refreshed before you put it back into the bike after each change. Also, the magnet in the filter is in the pre-filter, right before the filter medium, so it catches the big particles before they hit the filter, versus the oil pan magnet that just catches particles floating around in the pan. The magnet in the filter helps keep the filter cleaner, and keeps some of the tiny little bits as far away from the engine as possible.

So...is the expense justified in costs savings? Probably not. You have to buy a can of brake cleaner each oil change to clean the filter. But it sorta works out, because that way I can clean my brakes and calipers, the chain and sprocket, and the oil filter all at the same time...inspiration to do more maintenance...and you have the brake cleaner on hand to clean oil off all your tools super quick, and spray the grime off the engine while you're down there with the fairings off...but I love it. It's worth the convenience, to me, and peace of mind knowing that it's not paper and cardboard. =)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
on the whole in the filter mesh. i used to work on natural gas compressors( yess they are differant i know, but the same thought applies), and occasionally somthing would happen and make a whole in those resuable filters, and then they would be no good. so they just went back to using a regulare filter.

second about the particals. how much of the particalls are going to be magnetic. im talking about all the aluminum in the motor, a magnet will not pick that stuff up, so i was wondering what parts tend to wear the fastest in these motors, and such.

i really thinking about getting one, so im just trying to justify it.
i also average about 1500-2500 miles a month in my vehicles and now that my bike is my primary mode of transportation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
520 Posts
The Scotts filter doesnt filter worth a shit. 35 microns is all and I know for a fact Wix filters down to 12 microns. Although I would probably use one over a junk Fram. They are intended for race bike which change their oil obsessively and rebuild their engine more regularly. Filtermag's work well for getting the really small particles that the filter cannot filter.
 

·
Neutered
2006 MV Agusta F4 1000S
Joined
·
8,866 Posts
Originally posted by SubHuman
The Scotts filter doesnt filter worth a shit. 35 microns is all and I know for a fact Wix filters down to 12 microns. Although I would probably use one over a junk Fram. They are intended for race bike which change their oil obsessively and rebuild their engine more regularly. Filtermag's work well for getting the really small particles that the filter cannot filter.
Thing is...the Scott's filter's holes are ALL 35 microns. Nothing bigger than that gets through. The normal paper filters have grossly uneven filter medium, and while some of the holes may filter 12 microns, what happens when they get clogged? You really have to look at the average micron filtration, which is really difficult to measure because it depends largely on how long you leave the filter in the vehicle between changes, but almost all paper filters have an average filtration of 32-38 microns, 32 being some of the highest quality filters available. And you figure, if this is an average number, and they're filtering down to 12 microns, how big are their bigger holes? What are they letting through? So while the Scott's lets a higher number of small particles through, it lets a lower number of larger particles through (lower, in this case, being 0). The Scott's doesn't let anything bigger than 35 microns through, ever, and really, it's the big guys you want to look out for anyway. Also, it takes a particle bigger than 42 microns or so to actually do anything bad to any engine internals. I wish I could remember where I got this information so you (and me) could double check the accuracy of everything, but I can't remember exactly. It was a research project someone did for their masters in some specialized mechanical engineering study, and they had all sorts of references and test datum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
520 Posts
I hear what your saying. Its an interesting topic. If you were to install a FilterMag in conjunction with any filter including Scotts you are going to improve the filtration greatly. They are worth checking out. I installed one and changed oil and filter at about 500 mi. and cut the filter open. There was noticable build up on the inside of the filter housing where the mag was installed. If you check their website www.filtermag.com they show pics of cut open filters. Cost me $30 shipped off ebay and just snaps the the outside of the oil filter. They are truely powerful little magnets.


FilterMAG™'s patented design employs a focused magnetic force field, that amplifies its incredibly powerful Neodymium magnets, to generate the immense force needed to forcibly remove tiny particles below 20-micron from the oil flow; and retain increasingly smaller particles -- as small as 2-microns -- against the pressure of oil flow velocity.


 

·
Neutered
2006 MV Agusta F4 1000S
Joined
·
8,866 Posts
Yeah, the scott's filter comes with a stupidly strong magnet built in to the filter housing. It's a bitch to clean because it's so strong the metal bits don't want to come off. I appreciate the magnet, but it is a pain in the ass.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top