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It's less stressful for me to finish braking first and set the corner entry speed, and only then think about shifting and blipping the throttle. At that point speed is supposed to be lowest and you're setting up for acceleration, braking is out of the way.

I don't know how the fast guys do it tho :D
 

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most racers will tell you they downshift while braking; which is what i do. downshifting while braking (the two/two finger method) is kinda a fine art that takes time to get good at. but it works best when your hard into the brakes, also where your riding. if your just riding below 8 thousand, then it wont be as smooth as if your were riding in the power band.

process: lay into brakes, know how many gears you want to go down, wait till the later part of your braking (still on brakes), then click blip click blip, turn
 

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quick question guys,

when brakign and getting nito the proper gear for a turn do you

1) brake hard first then downshifting while blipping second?

or

2) brake while downshiftingAnd if you do #2, how to do you brake hard and blip the throttle at the same time? This semes to puzzle me since I find it very difficult to properly apply the needed brakign while trying to blip the thottle for smooth downshifting...


am i missing something?


My Drinking Team Has a Racing Problem!
 

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I brake and go down thru the gears at the same time adn depending how hot I go in it's a toss up of what's last, the revs pulling me into the turn or the backing it in witht he brake. Usually I never back it in on teh brakes (too risky on the street adn not enough practice) so I usually set up for a turn by braking, geting my speed right, off the brakes in the cornor, back on the gas to unload the front end and hit it hard once I'm coming out.

I'm not a professional rider, nor a teacher so just is just my style, not saying it'the best way just the way I throw the bike around after 14 years on the drt and road.
 

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"The key then is to allow your fingers to slide over the brake lever as you twist your wrist back for every blip on the throttle. To hold the brake lever with constant pressure, you have to allow your fingers to move on it. You can actually practice this if you think it will help. With the engine off, grab the handlebars of your bike and pull the brake on. Now, try to twist the throttle on and off quickly without moving the brake lever. If you can do this without pulling the lever in and out (it's okay if the lever moves up and down a little, this is just free play at the mounting point), then you've got it. All you have to do now is add in the other actions of pulling in the clutch, and changing down the gear."

This is what I have been trying. I'm getting aslittle better at it. Thanks for the help guys....


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yratellim - why don't you use the clutch like the pros do (yes it is possible to do on a 600)? nail your final downshift early and let the clutch. BOOM! instant rear wheel spin...i found this out on accident the first time i was on the track. [B)] didn't wreck but left a nice black streak. poor tires :(
 

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Here's the thread mentioned above:

/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=4776

FWIW, I blip while braking, with my index and middle fingers on the brake lever. It definitely takes a lot of practice do it smoothly.

Red
AMA #439394
 

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yellow plates, I guess I'm just used to my way since I been riding like this for so long and never had an accident with cornering. I don't think there is an absolute right way, whatever works for you in a safe manner that you don't let it slid down the road is fine by me.

I for sure don't ride as fast as a pro or even close, but I do ride the side of my tire all the way out with some nice lean angles carrying a good amount of speed. All on the right roads of course around here in South West, PA.
 

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You should be downshifting while braking (I'm talking on the track here, no reason to on the street). Braking, letting up on braking and then downshifting doesn't really work because you should be braking up to (or trail braking into) the corner and it's a bad idea to downshift while in the turn.

I don't think blipping is terribly easy to get down. But you can practice sitting still. Hold the brake at a constant pressure with your 1st two fingers and practice blipping. Once you have that down decently try it while moving..

It's definitely helpful in certain turns, but I don't blip that much anymore. You can do most downshifts smoothly by waiting a little longer to downshift so the revs are lower (still up around 6-8K?) and letting out the clutch just a touch slower than normal.
 

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I think the constant speed, up and down the gearbox rpm matching routine mentioned in that article is good advice. I been doing this for years and it's a cool way to practice rev matching and getting it done quickly. Being quick to blip is one thing, but it's also important to time the blip properly and to be smooth on the brake lever. I blip while braking whenever I can on the street, even when hardly braking- just for practice.

Keep practicing and I'm sure you will get it.

Gary M
www.bmgracing.com
CCS SW AM #28
'03 Kawi ZX636R
'00 Duc 748R
 

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It's pretty much practice, practice, practice.

You can practice on the street by putting your two fingers on the brake and just barely pull it in. Then concentrate on the throttle. Of course you use this practice when you really don't have to slow down too much. Just playing. ;)

It also might help to use your forearm to blip with since it moves along with your wrist. You don't want to close the throttle completel either since there is usually some slop in the cable. If you know what I mean.
 

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been doing the 2/2 method for the last few days and can honestly say I'm getting pretty good at it.


But you have to make sure you get the "slop" out of the throttle cable before doing this like mentioned before. makes it much easier, and for some reason it's easier to do when the engine is revving high and you come in braking hard.

It doesn't seem to be a worhtwhile tool to do when your casually running on the street.


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Originally posted by Andy_7676

...for some reason it's easier to do when the engine is revving high and you come in braking hard.
I agree, and that's really the time when it has the most use. Also, I use two fingers on the clutch lever and pull it just enough to disengage. Less pull means less time, and that usually translates into a smoother shift (engine has less time to slow down after the blip).

Red
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Originally posted by yratellim

yellow plates, I guess I'm just used to my way since I been riding like this for so long and never had an accident with cornering. I don't think there is an absolute right way, whatever works for you in a safe manner that you don't let it slid down the road is fine by me.
Careful with that line of reasoning, amigo: one day you'll have those white plates (sooner/later). You'll find out you're riding 10 sec a lap faster than previous, if you let go all the preconceptions and study/emulate the guys who win. There is a decision-break point between being out there puttering around and actually winning prizes.

Some years back (1997) I had the white plate with AFM (NorCal). I had to let it all go, play like a monkey and ape my instructors at track schools to increase the pace, find my personal best. Interestingly enough, follow them long enough, trust the bike and tires, use their downshifting technique, try similar lines, you'll find yourself significantly faster. One day you might even pass your instructors. (Nicky Hayden started somewhere with plenty of talent, but I guarantee he had great coaches too.)

Unless it crashes you out first.

That's the discipline, though: write-off the bike, write-off the mental hesitation, push the boundaries of what you "think" you can do. You'll find just about all the faster guys in your club do things like downshift/brake at the same time, always on their toes, trail brake a little rear into the corners to stabilize the bike, look and think 1-2 turns up the track, etc.

Try new stuff, push the edge.


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