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I have been taking classes and I am ready to purchase my first bike. I love the zx-6r and was wondering if I should purchase it as my first bike (btw... I do mean LOVE). :D
 

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IMO, I think an EX500 would be a more appropriate first bike. Often, a new rider will tend to go to fast (need for speed) in relation to the riding experience acquired. If that is the case for you, a ZX6R will get you into trouble very quickly, whereas an EX500 with about half the horsepower (but still a fun bike) will be a little more subdued. Hope this helps and good luck on your purchase.
 

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I agree with Hansel unless you have an unusual amount of self restraint the 6r will definitely get you in trouble. But after saying that if you are determined to get a 600 you can't go wrong with the 6R. :D
 

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I think you'd be fine on almost any bike as long as you ride well within your limits and get to fully know the bike before you go try to drag a knee. It took me over 10K miles to completely know and feel my bike. I started on a 600, and I think you'll be fine as long as you take it easy.
 

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I think you're better off with a 250 or a 500. Remember, if you're a beginner and have never been on a bike (motorcycle) then even 25hp can be a lot compared to zero hp. You'll have plenty of time to work up to your dream bike.

Don't kid yourself about self-control, either. It's like 13-year-old girls saying they'd never until they're married but when they're 17 it's like there's no tomorrow. Once you have a bike like that self-control is not even in the question. Self-control is buying a smaller bike.
 

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Really depends on you. Not knowing you I would say don't get a 600. For me I'm 6'2 and some change, and I feel too big for a 500. The woman at the bike place said a 250 would be way too small. I got a 6r because it felt a lot better to me.
 

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Don't kid yourself about self-control, either. It's like 13-year-old girls saying they'd never until they're married but when they're 17 it's like there's no tomorrow. Once you have a bike like that self-control is not even in the question. Self-control is buying a smaller bike.
That's a good point. I was really close to getting a 600 because I thought I had enough self-control to not get myself into trouble. After getting my 250, I found that that was the case about 99% of the time for me....but I'm sure I would have wrecked that other 1% of the time if I'd started out on something with 5x as much horsepower.

FWIW, keep in mind that for every post you see from someone who started out on a ZX-6R and did fine, there may be a "I started out on a ZX-6r and killed myself" or "I started out on a ZX-6R, hurt myself, and didn't want to ride anymore" post that you don't see, for obvious reasons.
 

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Yes. Of course no one's going to post any wrecks, deaths, or injuries and they are obvious reasons. For those who did start on 600ss bikes and are OK now, they're only very lucky and probably have very minimal skills no matter what they believe. It isn't until you've been on a bike that really needs to be worked for potential until you realize the potential of a bike like the ZX6R. Take a look at the video I posted before with the guy just blazing on the Ninja250... how many of you who started on the ZX6R can ride like that? Not very many.

For insurance and learning's sake... start with at least the EX500, shogun. Especially since you have a lot of traffic to deal with in NYC.
 

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are you a tool? if you're not, then get the bike that you want. but whatever you get, just take the time to learn how to ride it safely.;)
 

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If I were recommending a beginner bike to anyone that I didn't know, it would be a bike no larger than the Ninja 500. There would be the occasional exception, though. For instance, if the person was just too big to comfortably fit on a 500. That would not be safe, so then I would recommend something like an SV, Katana or a Bandit. This is the deal, though: If you have a full understanding of the machine and know how to operate a lever clutch, then you can ride any bike. Is that recommended? Definitely not…
You have to use common sense. That is the difference between being safe and becoming a statistic. If you are a speed demon at heart, then do NOT start on a 600+ sport bike. You would then only be asking for trouble. If you are a sensible person and know that you would progress with things slowly and comfortably to your ability, then a mid-class sport bike is not going to get you in trouble any easier than a 250. The margin for error is smaller, but it still won't go any faster unless you turn your wrist.

Take me for instance. I started on the road with a 929. Now granted, I rode dirt bikes and I understood the workings of the machine, but I never did run into any problems. Want to know why? Because I am a very sensible rider, that's why. I didn't go right out busting wheelies on the freeway and all that. I used my head and progressed to the speed of my ability. And contrary to Blue636's belief on people who start big, I am a VERY good rider. I know that I would not be any better today if I were to have started on a 250 or a 500. I treated my bike like a 500 when I first started, so it didn't make a whole lot of difference either way. It just said 929 on the fairing instead of 500.

Now, do I recommend people starting on a liter-class bike for their first bike? Definitely not… I am just using that as a case in point example. If you have an understanding of the machine and a general knowledge of how to ride it, and YOU USE YOUR HEAD, you will be just fine on that 636... though it may not necessarily be the 'best' decision.
 

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I agree with Sho Ninja. I have an 03 Ninja, no problems. My first bike. Just respect the bike and ride within your limitations.:D
 

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I agree as well.....Respect the bike and ride within your abilities and you will be fine. No matter how small cc bike you get cagers still drive as wreckless......my greatest fear is my surroundings especially California freeways.....but luckily my commute to work and back is a semi twistie 2 lane road....be safe and enjoy YOUR 636!
 

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I agree with Sho Ninja and Ajburt22. My first bike is a '03 636 and I'm doing fine. I ride with friends that started on a ZX-7R. They've been riding for 4 years and they're fine. Just take your time, ride within your capabilities and be safe.
 

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The best rider I know started on a Goldwing ;)

Anyhow, I started on a ex500 and I'm glad I did. I do feel starting on something alittle more forgiving can help accelerate your riding skills since you have to worry less about giving it to much throttle or breaking traction or doing a stoppy because you grabbed the brake lever a tad too hard.

I think the biggest reason for any new rider to start out on a smaller used bike is cost of insurance and cost of bike repairs. I would say almost every new rider will drop their bike, I would rather it be a used ex500 with little fairing to damage than a brand new zx-6r.


Heck I dropped my ex500 like 3 or 4 times. After you get some experience stupid little mistake don't happen nearly as much.

that's my .02 cents...

take it or leave it, the final decision is up to you, and if you have to ask this question, most likely you will go ahead and get a 600 supersport anyhow, since all the riders I know who started out on a smaller bike never asked if they should, they just did their research and decided to themselves.

whatever you do, ride safe and have fun..
 

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I bought my first bike about 3-4 weeks ago and it was a 2003 zx6r 636. I love it! I have only ridden dirt bikes and a couple street bikes a few times before my bike. I had little expierience. But I learned through a friend of mine and he taught me pretty well. Any 600 bike is fine for a beginner but you just have to respect it. At first I was easy on it and was scared to ride it hard. But now I am pretty good on it. I have put 2000 miles on it in 3 weeks.
 

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I'm gonna go out on a limb here and disagree with most of these posts... what seems to be the resounding catch-phrase here is "Respect the bike and ride within your abilities". For one, whether it's a 250 or 636 shouldn't you always respect your bike? If you don't you can get into a lot of trouble - it's only common sense. The big problem with that phrase is the part that says, "...ride within your abilities". Being a newbie to street bikes you virtaully have NO abilities. So, if you're going to jump on a 105 horsepower bike like the 636 how do you expect to be "within your abilities"? For one, you won't gain much ability with this kind of a learning tool. Also, how can you ride within your ability if a surprise comes up or you're in an unfamiliar situation? When you'll need all your skills one day to save your life or your bike, will you have the ability to do so? Do you think you'll have the skill to control the bike instead of the bike controlling you?

What you have to understand here is that you cannot respect the bike until you've ridden a smaller bike. If you get the ZX6R you won't know or respect its power until you've been on something like a 250 or 500 because you'll have nothing to compare it to. Don't believe in the "self-control" hype because you're only kidding yourself... you're not going to buy a bike capable of 100mph+ if you're only going to be doing 45mph the whole time.

Well, I guess you'll just have to buy the bike that you want since it seems like you're looking for a "Yes! Buy the ZX6R!" type of answer. Just remember, while many people have started on the ZX6R there are almost just as many who have been finished by it.

Good luck and I hope you make a wise decision, there will always be time to buy your dream bike.
 
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