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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so it's not a kawasaki (forgive me :() but i'll probably upgrade to a ZX6R after a few months

it's a GS500F. my dad rode it home and my first reactionwhen sitting on it today was "oh man this is heavy" because i'm only 5'6 120lbs. this is only a 500 bike though and from what I understand 6Rs and 10Rs are way heavier.

can you guys give me some tips on not falling over in slow speed maneuvers such as in parking lots?
 

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Welcome to the forum. I don't think anyone here is too prejudiced... maybe a couple, lol, but for the most part, we're all here to help each other out. Anyway, for the record, a 2011 GS500F weighs 439lbs and a 2011 ZX6R weighs 421lbs, so the ZX6R is actually lighter. However, it also matters where the center of gravity is. All bikes are different and you should sit on as many bikes as you can to find out which is most comfortable for you.

OK, first thing's first, did you take the MSF course? I'm guessing you haven't since they teach how to handle slow maneuvers very well. I took my course a few weeks ago and here's what I learned (and it works!!):

For slow maneuvers, keep the clutch in the friction zone and add a tiny bit of throttle - keeping the engine going a little actually helps balance the bike. Use the clutch and rear brake to control your speed. If you need to turn tight (ie. u-turn), use counter-weight while doing all the above. (Counter-weight = sit with half a cheek off the seat on the opposite side of the lean). Remember, the clutch is your friend.

Hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Welcome to the forum. I don't think anyone here is too prejudiced... maybe a couple, lol, but for the most part, we're all here to help each other out. Anyway, for the record, a 2011 GS500F weighs 439lbs and a 2011 ZX6R weighs 421lbs, so the ZX6R is actually lighter. However, it also matters where the center of gravity is. All bikes are different and you should sit on as many bikes as you can to find out which is most comfortable for you.

OK, first thing's first, did you take the MSF course? I'm guessing you haven't since they teach how to handle slow maneuvers very well. I took my course a few weeks ago and here's what I learned (and it works!!):

For slow maneuvers, keep the clutch in the friction zone and add a tiny bit of throttle - keeping the engine going a little actually helps balance the bike. Use the clutch and rear brake to control your speed. If you need to turn tight (ie. u-turn), use counter-weight while doing all the above. (Counter-weight = sit with half a cheek off the seat on the opposite side of the lean). Remember, the clutch is your friend.

Hope this helps!
Thanks

I have taken MSF but it was like 4 months ago, and it was on a 150cc dual-sport bike. This is WAY different lol
 

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Thanks

I have taken MSF but it was like 4 months ago, and it was on a 150cc dual-sport bike. This is WAY different lol
Well, good job taking the course! I was on a 250cc for my course, and it was definitely different when I hopped on my ZX6R but the fundamentals were the same. I kept practicing in my driveway and now i'm just as comfortable as I was on the 250cc. Keep practicing and I'm sure you'll get more comfortable with it. I used a lot of rear brake at first so I would barely be moving at all, just enough to keep my balance. Good luck!
 

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MSF course and practice. The 500 isn't heavy at all.

Our party piece on courses used to be to take a BMW boxer with touring fairing, panniers and box and ride all the maneuvers that the kids were struggling to do on their 125s.

No magic involved - just a little effort, so don't let the apparent weight discourage you. That said, a 125 is probaly ideal for getting those maneuvers right in the first couple of days or riding, which you've done, so the rest is practice.

Rob
 

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so it's not a kawasaki (forgive me :() but i'll probably upgrade to a ZX6R after a few months

it's a GS500F. my dad rode it home and my first reactionwhen sitting on it today was "oh man this is heavy" because i'm only 5'6 120lbs. this is only a 500 bike though and from what I understand 6Rs and 10Rs are way heavier.

can you guys give me some tips on not falling over in slow speed maneuvers such as in parking lots?
how old are you? Maybe a Ninja 250 would be better...
 

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Practice, really. Take what you've been taught here and in MSF, and just play around in an empty school parking lot. This cut my u-turn radius by about a third (in that figure-8 maneuver from MSF) in around 15-20 minutes.
 

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I posted before about how i used to do circles in my culdesac. circles with the barends touching the gas tank. doing slalom like maneuvers and whatever i could think of. I would do it for hours and i am so thankful that i did.

also keep your weight off the bars and use your legs for support because leg muscles are much stronger than upper body muscles and putting weight on your bars means involuntary steering input . after A LOT of practice I became able come to a complete stop and take off without ever taking my feet off the pegs.

its good that you want to become better at slow maneuvers because i know once i became confident i rode with 100% less stress knowing that i wasnt going to dump my bike in front of everyone.
 

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Welcome to the forum. I don't think anyone here is too prejudiced... maybe a couple, lol, but for the most part, we're all here to help each other out. Anyway, for the record, a 2011 GS500F weighs 439lbs and a 2011 ZX6R weighs 421lbs, so the ZX6R is actually lighter. However, it also matters where the center of gravity is. All bikes are different and you should sit on as many bikes as you can to find out which is most comfortable for you.

OK, first thing's first, did you take the MSF course? I'm guessing you haven't since they teach how to handle slow maneuvers very well. I took my course a few weeks ago and here's what I learned (and it works!!):

For slow maneuvers, keep the clutch in the friction zone and add a tiny bit of throttle - keeping the engine going a little actually helps balance the bike. Use the clutch and rear brake to control your speed. If you need to turn tight (ie. u-turn), use counter-weight while doing all the above. (Counter-weight = sit with half a cheek off the seat on the opposite side of the lean). Remember, the clutch is your friend.

Hope this helps!
I don't really feel like responding except to say the above bolded is huge.

The Daytona 675 has a very high center of gravity. It makes the bike feel like it's going to fall over at low speeds always. Worst bike ever for low speed maneuvers albeit the bike was not designed with that in mind at all (was designed for the track, which it excels at). Having ridden 4+ years (~2 on the 675), I still have trouble with low speed maneuvers on the 675.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
how old are you? Maybe a Ninja 250 would be better...
19.

And an update guys, when the bike is moving I feel fine. I have been riding around my neighborhood practicing stuff I was taught at MSF and it works perfectly.

The main problem is moving the bike with my legs (like to back out of a driveway) but once I put it in gear and go it doesnt feel heavy at all.
 

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All of the above is excellent advice. My two cents: Remember to look where you want to go. When I'm doing tight turns in a parking lot, my chin is nearly touching the shoulder on the side I'm turning to. It sounds simple but it's amazing how well it works.
 

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go eat a cheese burger. unless you're a girl. then you're good.

seriously just practice. None of these bikes are heavy in reality. Try to get on a Victory. or Full bagger Harley that is ~800-1000lbs.

And just because the msf was on a smaller bike doensn't at all make it any different. Remember what they taught you. They taught you technique, not 'how to ride XYZ bike'. That that technique and apply it.

That GSf is a great bike to start on so just get out there and practice.
 

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Thats how I get down baby
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19.

And an update guys, when the bike is moving I feel fine. I have been riding around my neighborhood practicing stuff I was taught at MSF and it works perfectly.

The main problem is moving the bike with my legs (like to back out of a driveway) but once I put it in gear and go it doesnt feel heavy at all.
try leaning back when you're backing up like actually taking your hands off the bars and sitting straight up. when you transfer more of your weight to the back of the bike and under your feet its a hell of a lot easier to maneuver
 

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19.

And an update guys, when the bike is moving I feel fine. I have been riding around my neighborhood practicing stuff I was taught at MSF and it works perfectly.

The main problem is moving the bike with my legs (like to back out of a driveway) but once I put it in gear and go it doesnt feel heavy at all.
I think I know what you mean. Your leg and core muscles will get stronger the more you do it and walking the bike will become much easier. I turn mine around in my garage after every ride and after a couple of weeks, I noticed it was much easier. Or maybe it was because I did my P90X that day, j/k. It gets easier as your muscles adapt. Are you tall enough to stand up flat footed over the bike?

Sent from my DROID using Motorcycle App.
 

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backing up without flat foots sucks imo; gotta do a gay waddle side to side and a misstep or a object in the way may cause a drop
 

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I don't really feel like responding except to say the above bolded is huge.

The Daytona 675 has a very high center of gravity. It makes the bike feel like it's going to fall over at low speeds always. Worst bike ever for low speed maneuvers albeit the bike was not designed with that in mind at all (was designed for the track, which it excels at). Having ridden 4+ years (~2 on the 675), I still have trouble with low speed maneuvers on the 675.
The 675 isn't THAT bad, it's on par with all the other rockets. The seating position only makes it seem worse. Either way practice makes perfect, the 675 hasn't given me any more trouble than any other bike.
 

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