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I assume you are making a right turn onto your street? First of all, make sure you are looking up and at WHERE YOU ARE GOING. Don't look down, at the edge of the road, etc. Second, hug the left side of lane before turning in to the right(make sure to use blinkers). That will give you the softest arc through the turn. Third, slow down! If you can't make the turn properly at speed, then slow down! Who cares if the people behind you get a little ticked off? Far better they get a little annoyed versus you running wide into oncoming traffic. That's all I have but I'm sure others will chime in :D

-2000 ZX-6R.....
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I guess I should have mentioned it was a right hand turn. I'm guessing what I am doing wrong is not looking where I want to go. Instead I am looking right in front of the bike. Thanks for the advise.
 

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Don't look where you are going. Look where you want to go. For instance, in the beginning of the turn, you should already be looking at least halfway through the turn. Your body will automatically adjust for where you look. That is why when someone over cooks a turn, they look far ahead into the turn where they want to go to escape going off the road. When you focus on the edge of the road, or at the front of your tire, you lean a lot more than you need to, or you don't lean at all. Hope this helps.

-Cops want a hot pursuit, so entertain them! -Shadee
 

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Motorcycles don't like to turn without any lean angle although at very low speeds the bike wants to fall over when you lean into a corner, so use your body as a counterweight. Push the bike down into the corner and lean your body out to balance the bike this along with turning your head not just your eyes will have you on track every time.

Some useful riding tips can be found at

http://www.stayupright.com.au

Confidence and Ability should not be Confused
 

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Try a little countersteering too, if you're really new to riding you might not know about that, seems a lot of new guys I run into don't anyway. So if you're turning right, give a little push on the right bar, and you can also pull up a tad on the left bar. And you can also push down on your right footpeg as well. This will turn your bike faster. Start doign it with small amounts at first until you get used to it.
 

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Okay, this is going to sound really pathetic but can someone give me advise on slow speed turning. For instance, coming into my subdivision from a main road (no turn lane)I find it hard to make the turn without going in the other lane sometimes. "Flame suit activated" :D
 

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Easy description of countersteering:

Push left, go left.
Push right, go right.


Red 2002 ZX-6R 636



It's not the speed that kills, it's the sudden stop...
 

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Wait just a second. Counter-steering is NOT something you want to do when making the turn newbiezxr describes. When going slow like that, the bike will turn just like a bicycle; not like a motorcycle at speed. If you try counter-steering in that instance, you will find yourself in the oncoming lane of traffic in a heartbeat.
 

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Not strictly true speedvlaze, when I did my license (many years ago), we had to do tight countersteering figures of 8 to pass. As Brian said, you counterbalance the tendency of the bike to fall in by leaning away from the centre of the circle.



Red 2002 ZX-6R 636



It's not the speed that kills, it's the sudden stop...
 

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You still have some speed maintained when counter-steering in the way Brian describes. Brian is describing how to counter-steer at a slower speed. I am describing how to steer when you are going too slowly to counter-steer. The method used is to be determined based on the speed newbiezxr is traveling when making the turn.
 

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Ok lets see if we can clear this up!

First of all if you are running wide in corners, slow or fast, the reason is because you are riding to fast either for the road situation or for your skill level. First thing to do is slow down.

Situation: Very Slow Speed Turns e.g U turns etc.

BEFORE you start to turn you need to be in the correct position on the road at the right speed and in the right gear for the given turn you are approaching. If you find you are still trying to slow down and/or change gears after you start the turn you have messed up, do it earlier. At very slow speeds hold a constant throttle a little off idle "drive = stability" and drag the rear brake to control your speed. Trying to change throttle position in the middle of a slow corner will make the bike buck and become unstable. Now to make the bike start to turn. Push on the handlebar in the direction you want to turn, left for left, right for right (countersteer) this will make the bike fall into the turn, lean your body out of the turn to counterbalance the bike and stop it from falling over (remember no lean no turn), then turn the handle bars in the direction of the turn and follow the turn through.

Remember don't look where you have been or where you are, Look where you are going.

Confidence and Ability should not be Confused
 

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Keep engine rev's well above idle. Slip the clutch and use back brake to modulate speed. Keeping engine revving helps to stabilize the bike (gyroscopic effect) and you minimize the risk of stalling the bike and falling over.

Also lean the bike but keep your body vertical. And look where you're going, not the front fender or cauges or whatever.

With sufficient practise you should be able to turn the bars in to steering locks and do a turn with no problems. The -03 6R:s turning radius resembles one of a tourist bus but you can do u-turns with that too if there's enough room ;)

------------------------
7,62mm. One size fits all.
 

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In addition to technique, make sure your tires are properly inflated. With under-inflated tires your bike will not respond as quickly to your inputs.

You never know how fast you can go, until you crash.
 
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