Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
5,994 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I added some stair tread grip strip on the sides of the gas tank, and black cloth with a wire frame under the dashboard:

Pictures by JeffinKentucky1959 - Photobucket

Note that I am having all new brake fluid added today, along with Michelin Pilot Road 3 tires front and back- I got a flat with the original Dunlop 207 back tire, even though it only had 500 miles on it from dryrot and being parked on the same spot for 2 years, and the original 2008 brake fluid looks beer colored.
 

· That Fighter Guy
2006 Kawasaki ZZR600 street fighter
Joined
·
15,167 Posts
Cool deal, and like no miles on it either. What's the point of the cloth stuff under the gage cluster? You think it looks too empty there or something?

Also brake fluid will change color as it's exposed to UV light, same goes for oil. Doesn't mean it's bad, just a chemical reaction occurs that changes the color. Now I would change all the fluids anyways with a new-to-you bike, but I thought I'd just point that out.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,994 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do not like the way the ZZR looks below the gauge cluster, with the black cloth cover looking better to me. I also get to look at superglued cracks in the clear speedometer cover now, thanks to a parking lot vandal. I got a flat back tire from it being parked for most of 3 years, without the tires raised off the floor or rolled a few inches once a month. I like the Michelin Pilot Road 3 tires a lot, for the way that they handle and look.

I had the shop replace all of the brake fluid when they changed the tires- the mechanic said some air bubbles came out of the front calipers. I tried the Motul racing brake fluid, to compare it to the Valvoline Synthetic DOT4 brake fluid now in my cruiser, to see if I can tell which fluid turns brown quicker.
 

· That Fighter Guy
2006 Kawasaki ZZR600 street fighter
Joined
·
15,167 Posts
Get a reservoir sock and it'll take a long time for it to turn brown.

Sorry to hear about the vandal. I'm sorry but I'm not digging the cloth thingy you're sporting. But it is your machine, so if you like it then more power to you.

Tiny air bubbles aren't uncommon when bleeding brakes. Even when the system is completely full, you'll still often get teeny tiny bubbles, which is nothing to fret about.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,994 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
According to the service manual, the ZZR brake fluid should be replaced every 2 years. The master cylinder cup and dust cover, and the caliper fluid seals and dust seals, should be replaced every 4 years. I go by the brake fluid getting browner as a guide for when the brake fluid needs changing, and my 2008 ZZR was rode only 378 miles from November 2007 until May 2011, and I thought it was best to add all new brake fluid.

I doubt I will change these brake parts that often, because I will probably ride it less than 2,000 miles a year, enough to just feed my addiction, but with fewer crash risks and less fuel used compared to riding it more. I also have my 2002 Honda cruiser to ride for short trips, that I averaged about 2,500 miles a year for the last 9 years.

The most important ZZR maintenance is to check the valve clearances every 7,500 miles, along with adjusting the carb pilot mixture screws and synching the carbs at the same time. I will probably have NGK iridium spark plugs added at the same time, instead of the stock NGK CR9E plugs.

The manual states that the coolant filter should be replaced once a year or every 6,000 miles, whichever comes first- do you think this is important to do that often?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,994 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I do not give a shit what some people think, one reason I rarely if ever post photos.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,512 Posts
Hey Jeff I live about 85 miles north on you in Milan Indiana. If you would like to ride sometime just let me know. You ever been to Rabbit Hash Kentucky before? Jay
 

· Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
If the bike sits that much I would flush the brakes once a year. for a $4 bottle of brake fluid it is very cheap insurance against moisture and contaminents wreaking havoc on the master cyl seals and piston and the caliper seals and pistons.

And I agree, if you like your bike, that really is all that is important as far as cosmetics go.
 

· That Fighter Guy
2006 Kawasaki ZZR600 street fighter
Joined
·
15,167 Posts
According to the service manual, the ZZR brake fluid should be replaced every 2 years. The master cylinder cup and dust cover, and the caliper fluid seals and dust seals, should be replaced every 4 years. I go by the brake fluid getting browner as a guide for when the brake fluid needs changing, and my 2008 ZZR was rode only 378 miles from November 2007 until May 2011, and I thought it was best to add all new brake fluid.

I doubt I will change these brake parts that often, because I will probably ride it less than 2,000 miles a year, enough to just feed my addiction, but with fewer crash risks and less fuel used compared to riding it more. I also have my 2002 Honda cruiser to ride for short trips, that I averaged about 2,500 miles a year for the last 9 years.

The most important ZZR maintenance is to check the valve clearances every 7,500 miles, along with adjusting the carb pilot mixture screws and synching the carbs at the same time. I will probably have NGK iridium spark plugs added at the same time, instead of the stock NGK CR9E plugs.

The manual states that the coolant filter should be replaced once a year or every 6,000 miles, whichever comes first- do you think this is important to do that often?
I have to disagree. I've got 36,700 miles on my '06 ZZR. I've synch'd the carbs once, checked the valves once, and never touched the cooling system. I still get 43-45 mpg with a +3 rear sprocket when I'm easy on it and I've had no mechanical failures to speak of, bike idles just fine, and runs great. The most important thing you can do is the oil and filter change on regular intervals. Now don't get me wrong, I'm not saying to ignore these things, but my point is that these bikes are more robust than most people give them credit for. My stock brakes had 29,000 miles on them, same pads and fluid for the entire time. Now that shit was neglect on my part, but the kind of riding I did (commuting) never really showed me "hey, your brakes could benefit from freah fluid, dummy". LOL. That and my pads still had over 50% left. As a matter of fact, I'm still running on the original rear brake pads (completely different front system), AND they passed tech at the track this last weekend. Still greater than 50% left on the old rear pads. I don't know anything about a "coolant filter". You sure it mentions one?

I don't know that you'll feel a difference with the iridium plugs or not. The CR9E's work perfectly fine. I believe the main advantage of the iridiums is longer change intervals.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
I think you are just perpetuating the myth of neglect and lack of maintenance is okay....which in my opinion is a piss poor thing for someone who is "respected" or thought of in some high regard or even as a "leader".
 

· That Fighter Guy
2006 Kawasaki ZZR600 street fighter
Joined
·
15,167 Posts
Did I tell anyone to do as I do? Did I say that at all? No. I simply said these are resilient machines and "here, can you believe I went this long without doing...". That's all. Was it smart? No. I checked brake pad wear very often and noticed they still had plenty meat and my bike stopped fine. I kept the oil changed, chain lubed and slack right, air filter clean, etc. Yeah I only did carbs and valves once, but I never said to follow my practices. Did I? No, sure as fuck didn't. I merely gave an example using my own experience. Thank you once again for hopping on your high horse and looking through your nose at the rest of us. You took what I said out of context and twisted it like I was telling everyone to ignore their machines. And all this time I thought you were misunderstood by others. Nope. Turns out everyone who has neg repped you did it for a viable reason.
 

· The Indifference Engine
Joined
·
6,136 Posts
I have to disagree. I've got 36,700 miles on my '06 ZZR. I've synch'd the carbs once, checked the valves once, and never touched the cooling system. I still get 43-45 mpg with a +3 rear sprocket when I'm easy on it and I've had no mechanical failures to speak of, bike idles just fine, and runs great. The most important thing you can do is the oil and filter change on regular intervals. Now don't get me wrong, I'm not saying to ignore these things, but my point is that these bikes are more robust than most people give them credit for. My stock brakes had 29,000 miles on them, same pads and fluid for the entire time. Now that shit was neglect on my part, but the kind of riding I did (commuting) never really showed me "hey, your brakes could benefit from freah fluid, dummy". LOL. That and my pads still had over 50% left. As a matter of fact, I'm still running on the original rear brake pads (completely different front system), AND they passed tech at the track this last weekend. Still greater than 50% left on the old rear pads. I don't know anything about a "coolant filter". You sure it mentions one?

I don't know that you'll feel a difference with the iridium plugs or not. The CR9E's work perfectly fine. I believe the main advantage of the iridiums is longer change intervals.
I jumped out the window of the 14th floor. At about the 3rd floor I thought to myself... man this isn't so bad.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
Did I tell anyone to do as I do? Did I say that at all? No. I simply said these are resilient machines and "here, can you believe I went this long without doing...". That's all. Was it smart? No. I checked brake pad wear very often and noticed they still had plenty meat and my bike stopped fine. I kept the oil changed, chain lubed and slack right, air filter clean, etc. Yeah I only did carbs and valves once, but I never said to follow my practices. Did I? No, sure as fuck didn't. I merely gave an example using my own experience. Thank you once again for hopping on your high horse and looking through your nose at the rest of us. You took what I said out of context and twisted it like I was telling everyone to ignore their machines. And all this time I thought you were misunderstood by others. Nope. Turns out everyone who has neg repped you did it for a viable reason.
Calm down take a breath and read the pm............PM sent, just like the first time...
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,994 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
I have never been to Rabbit Hash, Kentucky, but a couple of my friends have.

I went to the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum near Columbus, Ohio last Sunday with a friend, a 400 mile ride for one day. My butt and the inside edge of my right foot were a little sore- I am still getting used to the ZZR600, after riding a cruiser for 9 years. We both bought raffle tickets for a new Kawasaki Z1000 and a 1972 Kawasaki Z1 (900cc), maybe one of us will get lucky.

I might extend the valve check intervals some. The iridium plugs greatly improved the starting in colder weather for my cruiser, and I like the idea of less labor by changing them less often. I am planning to add the Evans NPG+ coolant later, because it lasts a lot longer than the Honda or Havoline Extended Life coolants. I was guessing that the coolant filter changing is excessive in the manual like for some of the brake parts, and too long for changing the engine oil and filter, in my opinion.

I got 56 miles per gallon for the last 2 gallons on the way back from the museum Sunday, going as low as 63 mph in 6th gear (interstates at 75 mph to highway 127 with a 55 mph speed limit)- I am guessing the pilot mixture screws are set leaner than normal- the engine starts better if I twist the throttle a little before pushing the start button, and if the bike is idling while waiting for a red light to move, the radiator fan comes on fairly quickly, but maybe they all do that- my 600cc liquid cooled cruiser with low compression needs to be revved for a couple of minutes while stopped to get the radiator fan to turn on, but it does have the Evans NPG+ coolant instead of a more typical coolant.

My engine oil mix of half 10w-40 Amsoil and half Rotella T 15w-40 gives it smoother shifting than with the original Kawasaki oil used for 500 miles, but I do not notice any difference for the clutch feel. This mix did more for the clutch feel and shift feel with my cruiser, compared to several other oils not mixed.
 

· That Fighter Guy
2006 Kawasaki ZZR600 street fighter
Joined
·
15,167 Posts
I jumped out the window of the 14th floor. At about the 3rd floor I thought to myself... man this isn't so bad.
Analogy fail.

Calm down take a breath and read the pm............PM sent, just like the first time...
:thumbup:


Jeff, sorry about all the BS'ing on your thread. Congrats on the purchase. Enjoy your new toy. Also, I don't agree with mixing different vicosity oils. I think you're overthinking things as far as that goes. Pick one oil and go with it, man.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,994 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I mix two engine oils for 3 reasons:

1. For my cruiser, it gave the best shift and clutch action, compared to several oils not mixed that I tried a year at a time.

2. Mark Lawrence knows a lot more about oil than I do, and he wrote this:

"I'm sometimes asked if it's ok to blend your own oils. Yes, it is. Oils are all made out of pretty much the same chemicals, and nothing really bad will happen. If I wanted to blend my own oil, I expect I would use something like 25% Motul 5100 10W-40 and 75% Chevron Delo 15w-40, which would get me both the advantages of a lot of diester stock (5100 is pure diester) and the diesel additive package. In the winter, however, I would use 25% Motul and 75% Rotella synthetic, to get the superior low temperature performance. In fact, I just run Rotella synthetic in everything I own, year round: ST1300, DL650, Superhawk, Chevy Silverado, motorhome." (I tried the Rotella Synthetic 5w-40, and it was not as good as my mix for either shifting or clutch action). I also did a web search for people using Rotella T 15w-40 for their motorcycles, and found several that have used it for years with no problems. A favorite dirt bike and street bike mechanic recommended Amsoil 10w-40, and it is available at a local motorcycle shop for about $8.50 a quart.

3. It costs a little less to use a good car oil filter (Purolator PureOne PL14610) and use half Rotella oil from Walmart for my motorcycle, and I think the quality is better than the stock Kawasaki choices. I tried all Amsoil 10w-40 and all Maxima 10w-40 for a year each, and they did not work as well as my mix, for the clutch and for the shifting with my cruiser- its wimpy clutch easily slips too much with an oil that is just a little too slippery, and its old style straight cut transmission gears are easily mis-shifted. The ZZR seems more forgiving for minor oil problems, but it runs a lot hotter and at higher rpms with more compression and will probably not go 300,000 miles plus without a rebuild like my Honda 600cc cruiser.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top