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Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking about gearing my bike. I don't think I want to go down in the front, because I've heard that it runs the engine a lot harder. Does it? If I go up 3 in the back, it will give me the same result, right? Does gearing really give you that much more performance? As always thanks guys.
---------John
 

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It really doesn't make a difference whether you go down in front or up in the rear as far a strain on the engine is concerned. It is easier and cheaper to go down in front. You can only go up two in the rear without getting a longer chain.

If you are into 1/4 mile racing it will make a slight difference. It will also make it easier to wheelie.
 

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The only thing I know about changing sprockets is that everbody seems to be going down a tooth in the front----haven't heard anybody saying that it works the engine harder.

But by going up in the rear you will lose some top end speed probably a noticable amount if you go up 3 teeth

try a search for a more detailed answer --- there have been posts on this subject

Paul
 

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The engine does not care if you go down in front or up in back, its the same thing...
Going down 1 in front is about the same as 3 up in the back.
It makes for good wheelies but wont give you much more outright speed off the line. Top end drops a bit, but do you really care if you can only hit 150mph instead of 160??
 

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Keep in mind that Kawasaki geared this bike the way they did intentionally, aiming for the average rider in average riding types at average speeds. If you are that average rider, it will likely be perfect. If you are a racer gearing for a certain track, that's a different thing. If you are a stunter or wheelie-demon-in-making, you'll benefit from lower gearing. But for the average Joe Streetrider, major changes for harder acceleration amplify the amount of shifting you'll have to do (already heavy on a 600 vs. bigger-bore bikes), and also your straight line run speeds. You may get off the line quicker, but you're going to lose out once the stock geared bikes get wound out. Even the best shifters in the world will lose SOME time tappin through the gearbox. (Again, not talking about gearing to suit a track...)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks guys. I should have mentioned this in the begining. I just want a little more power (torque) to ride wheelies in 2nd. I think I'll buy a front sprocket.
 

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Until the '03s most bikes have come with standard 530 chains & sprockets.
Most people change the front sprocket because its cheaper. On the 03 its not much cheaper if you buy Renthal sprockets.
Back to 530s....changing the steel rear to an aluminum will give you the added acceleration & save you some weight. The front doesn't save much weight.
A smaller front also puts more stress on the chain because it has a smaller rotating surface(forces the chain to make a tighter bend). Which I've been told leads to premature wear.

I always go up in the rear +2. Save the weight & the chain life...for what an extra $20!
 
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