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I live in a rural area and the state and local road crews, at times, distribute what we call sur pak (3/4" +/- pieces of crushed ledge) along the side of the asphalt pavement. Over time, some of it finds its way onto the travel path.

My question is, in corners, how much loose stone can our bikes travel over before the tire to road friction diminishes to an unsafe point?

I slow so much I probably resemble your grandfather riding yet I keep thinking at some point the bike might react as if on marbles. Overly cautious on my part?
Thanks,
Steve
 

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There are so many variables. Straight or curved road, speed, wet or dry, braking or not, etc.
The main thing is to avoid riding on gravel in a turn. That is asking for it. If it comes up unepexpectedly I brake BEFORE and straighten the bike up as much as possible then coast over it. I have skidded on gravel in a high speed turn before with oncoming traffic in the other lane. That will give you a near death experience!
 

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That's really a judgement call on your part and can't really be answered accurately here. A hell of a lot of new 250R owners have crashed their bikes this summer because of gravel in the roadway (including myself). I suspect most of it is being washed into the road by the almost daily downpours we've been having since June. The combination of new riders just learning to ride and more road debris than usual has made for a lot of wrecked 250Rs.
If it's just a stone here or there, with spaces for your tires to regain traction in between, I'd take it slow but not be too alarmed. If it's large areas of gravel covering the usable roadway I'd be extremely careful and seek an alternate route if it's a daily commute until it's cleared off the road.
If you see hazardous conditions like that you should call your local Department of Public Works and alert them to the problem. If they're not too busy and are in a good mood they may come to the scene to clean it up, possibly preventing a rider coming up after you from going down.
 

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One single biggest cause for any crash is one's throttle control. Don't chop your throttle, most of the time you can ride out a lot of shit, if you don't panic.

Look at MotoGP for example, they're pretty much doing the same speeds in the rain as they do on dry surface. Granted they are pros and they have race tires and blah, blah, blah. My point still remains, look through the turn and DON'T CHOP the throttle.

Yes, you can straighten the bike and slow down. But most of the time you don't have the time or space for that.
 
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