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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you know if your rebound/compression is set to hard or too soft? What kind of symptoms would i expect to encounter? Any help is appreciated.
 

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Honestly, to really learn about the suspension settings, take the bike to a shop that has someone knowledgeable about setting up bike suspensions. You can have your suspension dialed in for you and learn a alot more from that guy than you will ever learn on any forum. I'm not saying that people here don't know what they are talking about, just that trying to explain things and the wealth of "misinformed" ("I know I'm right 'cause Jimmy-Jo-Bob told me and he has been doin this stuff for 6 months!!") people on the internet make it difficult to peice out the stuff that is correct and worth keeping.
 

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not to a Dick, look in google under supsension for motorcycles...
Also check out the traxxion manual and one of many books that they sell about the topic...
Reading is one way to increase your knowledge base as well,
check in the racers corner on this firum someone put up a huge post that will help you on this and that, effects and feelings of the bike.
Came from a book i read about it..

Also a RACE shop can help you out maybe...not the local hey we sell bikes, and HARLEYS
 

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OK... sit tight, this might take a while. I work with a suspension tuner and tune hundreds of bikes at track days on the west coast multiple days a month. The guy I work with is Dave Moss and is a suspension genius, his website is www.feelthetrack.com and has a bunch of free articles that will help you learn about your suspension.

So here we go...
1. Rebound - First I'll talk about the setting the rebound on the forks, this is assuming that you have first set the correct sag for your bike front and back (info on sag can be found on the website above). Now your going to perform a series of things to check the rebound on the bike. Stand next to your bike on the left-hand side and reach and grab the bars. Stand the bike up and kick up the kickstand and hold the front brake. Now you're going to pull the bike upward and then slam it into the ground, as soon as you've pushed it down release pressure and let the bike rebound on its own. This should be one smooth motion, not holding the forks in a compressed position and then letting go, but more of a bounce on the forks. Then feel how the bike rebounds, ideally the bike should go down, come up, and stop. It should complete one complete stroke down and up. If the rebound damping is too weak, the front end of the bike will bounce up and down, often entering as many as 3 or 4 strokes. Also, when the rebound damping is too weak, when you let off the front brake while riding it will feel almost as if the front end of the bike bounces up towards your face, and throws the whole chassis backwards. If the rebound damping is too strong, the bike will rebound very slowly, and take a long time to get back to the top of the stroke. The rebound adjusters are found on the top of the forks, the tiny little screws or allens inside the preload adjuster. Adjust these accordingly so that they are both exactly the same and the bikes does as stated above. Screwing them in = more damping, out = less

The rear rebound is a little trickier to feel, as you can not always see whether it is too stiff or too weak. But, the same principle applies. If when pushing on the tail or seat the bike seems like the rear almost wants to bounce off the ground then there isn't enough damping, and if the rear rebounds very slowly, like you can watch it come up over a matter of seconds, there is TOO much damping. The rebound adjuster for the rear shock is always found at the bottom of the shock, and in = more damping and out = less.

NOTE: For basic setup, once the rebound has been set, do not touch it again, it should stay where it is.

2. Compression
This is what controls how the bike FEELS on the street. The more compression damping the stiffer the bike will feel, and more harsh to ride around the street where there are potholes and bumps and what not. The less compression damping, the more plush or smooth the bike will feel. The compression adjusters are always found at the bottom of the forks and at the top of the shock. These are what you should adjust to make the bike feel how you like it. Screw the adjusters in and you'll get more damping and a firmer ride. Screw them out and you'll get the opposite. Make sure that the compression screws are roughly the same in the front and back, this can be measured by counting clicks or turns from all the way screwed in.

NOTE: Try to perform these adjustments when the bike is hot, as the viscosity of the oil inside the forks and shock changes when it is hot and thus changes the rebound and compression damping.

BIGGER NOTE: Be careful when changing your suspension and understand it is at your own risk. The best thing you could do is to see a Suspension Shop and have them set up the bike for you, they are pro's and even tiny adjustments can make a huge difference. It shouldn't be more than 40-50 bucks.
 

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Originally posted by 6RracerMP


BIGGER NOTE: Be careful when changing your suspension and understand it is at your own risk. The best thing you could do is to see a Suspension Shop and have them set up the bike for you, they are pro's and even tiny adjustments can make a huge difference. It shouldn't be more than 40-50 bucks.
Performance-wise, at the track, $50 suspension set/tune was more bang-for-the-buck than any other mod.

_____________
Kevin
Black '01 ZX-6R
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the input i think i will have a professional set it up for me but i kinda wanted to know what was what and a general idea of how adjusting the rebound and compression affected things. Ill definetly check out that website.
 
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