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Well, I came across another interesting thing....Some guys don't use the thermostat in their bikes....ZX7R for example...Proclaiming better cooling characteristics....can anyone back this up......if not this will be another of my next mods.Then I will let others know.
Unless someone else wants to try it now....currently there is much snow outside and will not be able to go biking for 3-4 months yet!

Anyone???


Jason

Everyone has their own thing.....
 

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I don't know about the later models but the folks at Factory Pro say the '95-'97s run too cold and recommend that you block off part of the radiator to get the temp up. I have about half of my radiator covered to get the temp up with the outside temperature running 70-80 degrees here in south Texas. Generally running any engine on the street without a thermostat is a bad idea as the engine rarely ever gets warmed up. On the track where the engine is running flat out most of the time it might be a different story.
 

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I agree with Johnsey. If you live where it's always hot then fine, but if you live where it can get a bit cold then you definately want a thermostat to ensure your bike warms up to opp' temp quickly after start up. And what's wrong with the "cooling characteristics" of your zixxer anyway??

Tony
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Maybe it's me but my 6 tends to get hot too easy....

Runs around 80 degrees...but shoots up to fan temp in a blink...

I'll check more into it...


Jason

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Jason,
my zixxer runs at around 80~90 degrees C in traffic and will punch up to +100 degrees at the slightest hint of standing still in the traffic. Mine got to 109 C a while back on a really hot day, stuck in traffic on a motorway. The thing is, our bikes only have a very small elec' fan and they struggle to keep on top of things in traffic. Once moving however, mine runs very consistent temps. I did a run last summer at speeds 180~220km/h (68km covered in 20 minutes, used 6 litres of fuel!!) non-stop for about 20 minutes, the ambient temp was 40 C, and the temp gauge on the bike never went over 80 C. The same bit of road done in winter at 15 C at 120km/h and the bike runs at 75 C. So I reckon the cooling system is doing a pretty consistent job on that basis.

Tony
 

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A trick I picked up working on small block Chevys is to drill a couple of small holes in the lip of the thermostat. This will still let the motor warm up to a safe temp, but the extra flow through the holes help to reduce the temp a bit.

There is a product called Water Wetter that is great for reducing temps as well. It would drop about 20 degrees F in my old Camaro. I don't think you would see a big of a drop in a 600cc motor though. It works best with straight water, but it can be used with normal coolant as well.

Kevin V
00 ZX6R
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great stuff....Redzx6.....sounds about the same as me....although I notice a difference in performance when she gets real hot...I'm thinkin the jetting is a little off....not much though,she works real pure...
I installed a Muzzy fan blad....it works real good....when it kicks in there is no time before she cools down.....might just direct switch the fan to keep me happy...

Redzx6...where in Australia do you live???Was there in 92' and did some biking on a VT250 from Sydney to Twin Towns....amazing roads...twisties...super smooth pavement....loved every minute of it....oh to be 19 again and have the world at my disposal....lol

Jason

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The thermostat has one main function, to bring the engine coolant up to proper operating temperature quickly, and keep it there. It does this by restricting flow to the radiator until the coolant exceeds a set maximum temperature.

When it reachs the temp, it opens up and lets the hot coolant flow past until the collant is below its closed temp, and then repeats the cycle.

This helps keep the engine at a steady temp, which helps the engine make consistant power. Hotter engines lose power.

If you remove the thermostat, the advantage you gain in increased coolant flow through the radiator, and a couple less hp lost via the water pump, is negated by inconsistant engine temps and lost hp in warm weather.

For a car you have the side effect of not having good heat in it during the winter, but on a bike that isn't such a big concern.

Personally, even if it was a racing only bike, I'd leave it in, unless I can no longer increase my riding skills, and 1.5 hp is that desperately needed, and can't be found anywhere else.

BC
 

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Jason,
I'm in Sydney, but am about to move approx' 200km north of Sydney to a large provincial city called Newcastle (closer to the good mountain roads). Yeah we do have some great biking roads in Australia. The lack of population and big distances between one city and another means that you can find plenty of isolated spots to ride "a little" over the speed limit. The down side to that is if you have a get off up in the mountains, as you will be in situation where it will take at least an hour to get help in and thats only if they use a helicopter. Sadly I had a mate die just before Xmas up on one of our favourite mountain roads. Took a hour and 15 minutes for the chopper to get in and by that stage all that was left to do was fly his body out.

Anyway, you say you road Syd'>Twin Towns, do you mean Twin Towns on the Queensland/New South Wales state border?? If so, that was a bloody long ride on a VT250!!! I dare say you would of ridden straight up Hwy 1? If you thought that was good, you should come back and try some of the "real" biking roads. Shit, with the value, or lack of to be specific, of the Aus' dollar you could have a 2 weeks of bike riding out here for stuff all.

Tony
 

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Just remember that removing the thermostat will do nothing to help cool after your engine has reached the 180 point. After then, it's full open anyway. Nothing will change in your traffic temperature or your moving temperature, unless that drops below 180. The only thing you would notice, is a longer run-time required to bring it up to temp. The thermo does helps the engine come up to temp quicker, and keeps it up for a better fuel burn which lowers emissions and raises fuel economy.

-gary
'02 6R
 
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