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After my first post as "Thoughts after my first 30 miles", I think it would be of interest to post my progress and some mistakes I make during my ride and hope this can help other friends grow quicker!

I just finished my first 160 miles. For the most recent 30 miles, I rode all the way on the country road to a tiny BBQ restaurant, had dinner and then rode back. It feels just great!

I am especially amazed by so many riders who say hello to me with their left palm down gesture! I was a little unprepared at the beginning and now I am saying hello to every riders passing by and they almost always wave back!

Ok, after the fun part, here are something I did wrong and should be avoided by all new riders!

1. Never ever touch the brake during the curve! This includes your clutch lever if you happen to ride your clutch before entering the curve. I used to drive a stick Mazda RX-8 and one bad habbit I formed is to step down the clutch before the apex (half way in the curve), do the heel toe and then suddenly release the clutch to beautifully power slide (drift) over the curve. But this is extremely dangerous on the motorcycle! When I first unconciously did this ( I know I shouldn't do that from my MSF class but still did it once or two), the RPM was to low and when I release the clutch, the engine break locked the rear wheel and the bike shaked like crazy. I am lucky enough to recover from that and learned the lesson without paying any cost.

How to avoid this: my way to avoid this is to fully release the clutch after down shift before turning. The engine break may feel jerky, but it is waaay safer in the corner becuase you only need to worry about the throttle now.

2. Do not fully release the throttle when shift up. Many of you may already know that you need to blip (similar to heel-toe on a car) during down shift. But what I found is that you should not release the throttle totally during up shift as well, what we should do is probably release 500 rpm to match the gear with RPM.

How to avoid it: what i do is release the gear, up shift, rev to just below the orginal RPM , and then release the clutch. I believe we may also just put the clutch at the friction zone and ride it for while becuase motorcycle all use wet clucth (unlike cars, you should never ride the clutch).

3. Always wear your helmet. This is probably unnecessary to repeat. But, but, if you ride during dusk time, there will be so many bugs hitting your face! Trust me. My helmet needs cleanins quite often becuase of these bugs. Think about it that all the bugs could rest on your face if you don't wear the helmet!

I really hope this might be of help. I will try to reach 600 mile soon so that I can release all the potential of the engine. If you google the dyno chart of 250, you will see that 90% of the torque resides between 4000 and 11000. If you follow the 4000 break-in limit, it will ride like a 50cc scooter. : )

I am now using the 8000 limit.

Good luck to all of you, ride safe and have fun!

Saferider
 

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I am especially amazed by so many riders who say hello to me with their left palm down gesture! I was a little unprepared at the beginning and now I am saying hello to every riders passing by and they almost always wave back!
Ok...so know when to wave, and know when to nod. Should be obvious and intuitive...but I know a friendly guy:rolleyes: who once returned a wave as he was rolling to a stop at a stoplight (2-3mph) with the clutch in and geared down to 1st. The resulting 'abrubt stop' combined with one hand on the handlebars nearly caused a drop. He only saved it inches from the pavement due to his superhuman strength and good looks. That guy is awesome...if only he wasn't so damn dumb.
 
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