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Discussion Starter #1
When I slam on the brakes hard, my rear tire slips out to one side, usually the right. I have a new rear tire on the bike so there really is not any unusual wear. Is this normal? I mean I have just been practicing hard breaking so that I know where my bike stands..it just doesn't seem safe if this were to happen at a higher speed.
 

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its very normal....

becareful cause doing this at high speeds could lead to the infamous "highside"

do yourself a favor and practice using more front brakes and alot less rear....And you might want to not use any rear brake at all so you dont get in the habit of jamming on the rear brakes in panic situations.


I try and use my rear brakes only when I have too (i.e. on extremely slick surfaces like soft dirt, sand, ice, basically any place where my front end will lock up imediately).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So you mean this skid is probably from to much rear breaking? In the safety course I took earlier this summer they advised us to use
70% front vs. 30% back. So you mean I should mostly use front at higher speeds? What is the "highside"?
 

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Since learning the higher art of braking(a bike with real brakes)I haven't touched a rear brake in the last 4 years or so(unless at a stop light to take a rest or something).


Highside describes the way in which you are to come off the bike in an accident. The rear tire slides out from underneath then suddenly catches traction, hooking up, then tossing you up and over the "highside" of the bike. A lowside being, the tire continues to slide to the point of crashing.

All which we don't like at all.


Jason
 

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What they teach you in MSF is great for cruisers and other bikes with weight on the backend. Most modern sportbikes (including the 99 6r) have very little weight on the rear tire to keep it from skidding around, and ultimately high siding you if yer not careful.

The only time I ever touch the rear brake is to hold the bike still at a stop light on the street.
 

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I also rarely use the rear brake. NEVER use it while canyon bombing as the transitions will cause the rear lock up easily. As a general rule of thumb I only use the rear brake under 20 mph slowing down in a strait line or for a very sharp U-turn at low speed.
 

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The info from the MSF is getting a little outdated (70%/30% braking)IMO. With the way technology is advancing as far as brakes, it's probably more along the lines of at least 80% rear & 20% front. Like Striker, I just use the rear for 20mph or less, it locks up to easy.
 

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I use them both, a good habbit to learn. If you never use your rear brake and get into a situation where you need more than just your front brakes you most likly will lock up your rear brake and lay the bike down.
 

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The only situation, unless you're an expert racer, that you might *need* your rear brake is in ultra low traction conditions, i.e. mud, dirt etc.

On dry tarmac, it will NOT slow you down any faster than only the front, presuming you're not on cold or crap tires. Possibly you could help the bike lower its stance with the rear brake prior to braking with the front, but that's an advanced tchnique, and once you start using the front brake, the rear wheel will not have any traction left for braking. 70/30 has nothing to do with our bikes on dry asphalt. 100% front brake, 0% rear if you want max braking force. True for both straight line or corners, but obviously I'm not referring to the force applied on the lever by 100%, but the distibution of braking force between front and rear (I have to say this in case someone misunderstands and crashes:D)
That's my 2 cents, and a lot of more experienced people share this view, in fact, every racer I've talked to about this. Becomes evident if you practice max braking too.

If your front tire locks up, then you're probably engaging it too fast, you need to let the weight transfer to the front before you can max brake. Depending on how your bikes suspension is set up, and your tires, the maximum braking you can do will be limited either by the front sliding or you endoing, i.e. the rear coming up in the air too much.

With rennsports and stock suspension settings I had problems with lifting the rear too high on the track, and even now with stiff settings, the rear lifting, and the size of my balls, are still the limiting factor, not the front locking, no matter if I'm going 50km/h or 250km/h.

I agree with minytrker in the sense that it's always good to master all aspects of your bike, but if you do get into an emergency on dry roads and you use the rear your chances of washing out are far greater. If you go offroading, by mistake of course, say on grass, and you use the front then you're going down, but on asphalt the reverse is true (i.e, using the rear will more likely result in an accident). Am I confusing yet?:D

Funny, I think this is the n:th time I've commented on this, same with you minytrker, both keeping the same stance. Whatever works for you, I guess. But how can you get any traction out of the rear if you're applying max force to the front? Completely impossible in my experience. The rear will be off or almost off the ground. (In the dry)


Oh, and mred mistakenly put the percentages wrong, I'm sure he meant 80% front and 20% rear. I say 100% front (again).
 

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Oops! thanks for the correction, that's what I meant...:D
 

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The rear tire is still on the ground enough to slow you down. If I need to slow down real fast I use engine braking to the max and both brakes. I do understand where you are coming from about the rear tire not being on the ground very much but I think most people will apply to much front brake and flip over or wash out there front end by just the front brake. I do think just the front brake will slow down pretty close to the same as both brakes but I just think its safer with engine, and both brakes which may be advanced I dont know. It does depend on your tires also, crappy tires will let your back tire lock up real easy.
 

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actaully Keith Code also said you could get 100% maximun braking out of the front tire alone on modern sport bikes on clean pavement.


if you read my post above, I'd agree 100% with RedFinn...I also posted this about 3-4 times already on the boards ;)
 

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i used to be a bigtime back brake user like 75%back 25%front but i am learning to use the front cos i almost highsided in dirt and i was goin a little to fast. you should do what feels comfortable to you. if you use to much back brake you'll kno cos your shit'l always be sliding out to much front brake wont hurt unless your tryin to do a stoppie like my dumbass.
 
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