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G'Day Guys/Gals,

i have a '96 and have a slight problem with my fronts pads. i put in some goodridge pads about 10,000kms ago and when i recently checked the pads my inside right pad was almost gone while the others where about half worn thru. has anybody had the same prob? i am think a sticking piston or something and i may have to strip down and rebuild the caliper.

any advice or suggestions?[:p]
 

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Yeah, my '95 is doing the same thing. I think it has something to do with the way the front wheel is centered in the forks. I read somewhere (long time ago, somewhere in cyberspace) that you could minimize the problem by centering the axle with the brakes by putting the axle in and tightening the end, then applying the brakes before tightening the pinch bolts.
 

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damn, haven't checked my brakes for that problem...better do that before spring.
as for your problem: maybe more pressure is exerted on the right pad due to the way the brake lines are set up?
 

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The brake system is hydraulic; the pressure on each piston in the caliper is the same. The problem is likely a sticking piston. If the calipers have not been rebuilt, they are overdue. If the lining thickness of either pad in a caliper is less than 1 mm, replace both pads in the caliper as a set.

To evenly push out the cleaned pistons, completely push them in, and then install the calipers. Lift the front, spin the wheel, and pump the lever until there is good braking power.

The procedures that are performed before tightening the pinch bolts keep the forks from being held in a V, which increases stiction (a different problem).
 

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Personally I wouldn't try to do it myself if I didn't know what I was doing (so I'd pay someone else to do it). Just like brake fluid change, I don't do it because I don't have the tools so I just try to substitute.

Them's be my brakes man! I don't want to mess with my brakes and if something happens god forbid then I can blame it on the bike dealer/mechanic that did the job for me :D
 

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Naaw, man, brake fluid is a breeze :)
Ask someone who knows what they're doing to help you out once, after that it's no problem doing it yourself. I have zero experience with anything mechanical but you learn as you go along. Don't know anything about pulling a caliper apart yet, though.

Note: I agree with beezer that if you don't have the knowledge or someone to help you/consult maybe not doing so much yourself is good. Unless you're [:M113] like me :D. But c'mon there's always someone you can ask, right?
 

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The calipers are very simple to work on. There are two bolts that hold the two halves together and a O-ring between the two halves. The problem lies in getting the pistons out. You can used compressed air. I was able to get mine out using a pressure brake bleeder that I got from Phoenix Systems. The part of the piston that contacts the brake pad is made out of a soft material (like brake pad material) that is easily damaged. The seals are very expensive ($3 each) from Kawasaki and there are a lot of them (16). I replaced them the last time I took my calipers apart but after taking a look at the old seal this time I am going to reuse them.
 
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