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Discussion Starter #1
Hello fellow Kawasaki fans,

I am currently in progress restoring a 1994 ZZR 600 E2. I have it to the point where it starts fine, however the idle speed goes ballistic.
It 'idles' between 6k - 8k.

I had the carbies off and cleaned them. However I only opened and cleaned the side with the jets in it, not the other side with the black covers (vacuum side ?)
Could it be a stuck needle valve on this side ?

I tightened all the rubber boot clamps between carbie and engine. The rubber boots appear o.k. and not cracked or deteriorated. Also I adjusted the idle screw
all the way to low idle already and played with the throttle cable adjustment. Both throttle and choke are operating smooth without stickiness and I am pretty
sure the butterfly valve closes all the way.

I have a carbie rebuild kit. Should I take the carbies off again and open the other side and replace the needle valves and seals ? I also noticed that carb 4 is leaking a bit
of fuel, so needle valve stuck open ? This might be part of the problem ?

Thanks for any suggestions,

Andy
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Oh I forgot to say the bike currently doesn't have its airbox installed - sure that wouldn't make a huge difference ?
 

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The float valves reside under the float bowls ...same area which you say you serviced. ??? You didn't see them while carefully inspecting and "cleaning" the area?
However, additionally the vacuum slides and jet needles should be removed, cleaned, rubber diaphragms inspected for rips/tears.
1994? At 26 years old this thing needs new consumables all around (fuel rail orings, float valves) and pro cleaning to assure success on 1 carb pull. Uh, float heights and fuel levels adjusted and confirmed too, maybe?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for your reply. Yes, that's the side I've opened, however I only removed the two jets and the jet holders and cleaned them and the float chambers and butterfly valves with carb-cleaner. I did not remove the floats bowls and the float valves. I guess I should have... first time I try to service a carb. I do have new float chamber seals, float valves, float valve seats, float valve o-rings and fuel strainers in a carb rebuild kit. So I guess I remove the carbs and replace those parts. Do you think the high idle rev could be cause by those parts being defective ? The jets and jet holders are nice and clean now after my first attempt of cleaning.

I am a bit scared that I will damage those rubber diaphragms when I remove them, but it sounds like I should have a look in there.

There is a guy here in the area which does ultrasonic cleaning of carbs. For sure the best way to go, but this will be $$$$ :-(

Have not checked the fuel level and float heights.
 

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Internet forum folklore "carbs are easy" is total BS. Precise instruments they are. Experience educates one in troubleshooting various, obscure problems. I did 10 years in a shop as a kid in the 70's before FI was introduced to bikes...you HAD to learn carbs. I'm still kinda in the business to this very day.
BTW...previous owner errors and "adjustments" are classic red flags. Giant, oversized jets (sometimes drilled out!), stripped screws everywhere, gross assembly errors...right.... "carbs are easy". Sure.

Anyways to your dilemma....some items to check and be aware of:
*rubber intake manifolds at head and airbox side.......check for rips/splits
*bench check the synch of the 4 throttle plates, look for 1 or 2 way out from others (previous hands in there?)
yes, you must do float valves/seats, important to *check all float heights to spec printed in service manual (view instructions)
*be very careful in removing diaphragms for inspection and access to wipe each needle and slide clean. Don't yank on them (the true source of many a ripped diaphragm)
*pull each pilot screw, spring, tiny washer and oring (replace oring) This orifice is part of the tiny, twisting, internal pilot circuit and leads to the pilot jet orifice. Remove both jet AND pilot screw...spray both ends, blow with compressed air.
*assure the idle screw is free and operational, assure the throttle plates react (open and shut) as you adjust idle screw on the bench

Enough carb 101.....if you were here in US, I'd likely have your carbset fixed up in a day, barring further issues, bolt on and run. Not "easy", but done with experience, effort, focus using proper modern equipment.

Good luck with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you so much for your reply and your help. I think I will enlist to help of my local carb expert (he does that for a living). He has the ultrasonic cleaning equipment etc. I give him a call today and see how much this costs me ... but reading your posts I think this is beyond my capabilities and well worth having done professionally and done right once to avoid problems in the future.
While I have them off I will thoroughly inspect the rubber seals at the intake. They looked o.k. when I had the carbs off but I will have a closer look .. maybe there is a bit of false air coming in that way. To bad I am not in the U.S .. I would gladly enlist your help. But shipping them to you from here would cost more than a new set, let alone the various carriers damaging it on route. I let you know how it goes.
 

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I left a lot out, too. There is more, much more, but agreed 26 year old carbs best left to a pro.
 
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