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So I'm cruising along on my ninja, and all of a sudden it dies. I coast off the main road. All the lights work, horn, turn signals work. The dash is dead and the fuel pump doesn't prime when I switch on the ignition. I gain access to the fuse box. The ignition fuse is blown. Replace it, blows immediately when I turn the key to on. I get a truck, haul it home. Today I start digging into it, thinking it's a bare wire, so I take it apart far enough to remove the air filter, took a break. When I returned I got to thinking I've disconnected a few electrical components, maybe I could do some more troubleshooting. I reconnected the ecu, turn the key, no pop. This continues until I have the bike completely reassembled, and running. Now I'm glad I'm not forking out cash today. However my weekend was ruined, and there is no guarantee it will not happen again. What would you do now?
 

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Now I rode it and the ignition fuse popped againd. Luckily I hadn’t even gone a block away. Lol
 

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2011 Kawasaki ER-6F
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Now I rode it and the ignition fuse popped againd. Luckily I hadn’t even gone a block away. Lol
Not sure off the top of my head but I'd check charging voltage and the reg/rec might be over charging due to faulty components at higher rpm
 

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Do you think that would cause the fuse to pop when it’s not running?
 

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Do you think that would cause the fuse to pop when it’s not running?
When it's NOT running? Oh dear honestly not even a clue but it's always worth checking when having fuse issues, that said your issue sounds more like a short between the battery and the fuse box I'd probably look at the wiring from battery to fuse box then follow the wiring to the ignition barrel, can't think of anything else, no weird accessories wired in right?
 

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None at all
Yea I'd double check the charging circuit anyway then trace the wires i mentioned before. Not much else you can do yourself unless you take it to a mechanic, electrical issues like this can be extremely troublesome to figure out, but a bad reg/rec can certainly blow fuses.
 

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If you have USB outlet, any other electrical accessories, take them all off (or disconnect all of them from the bike). And, run the bike for the next few days and see if it still do that.
Fuse blowing up = circuit overload
Something is drawing more current than it should.
Spark plugs, coils ...

 

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The issue you're describing could be cause by an electrical component in the bike that is most likely going bad. For example a bad coil could be the cause for the short. I had that issue in my bike, I have a Yamaha. Turns out a bad coil for the rear cylinder was the culprit. I would start ohm testing the coils, you'll need a voltage meter similar to the one below. You are going to need the specs ( resistance )

Similar to this: Etekcity Digital Multimeter, Volt Ohm Amp Meter, Voltage Tester with Continuity, Diode and Resistance Test, Dual Fused for Anti-Burn, Red, MSR-R500 - - Amazon.com
 

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Bad ground is the likely problem (when it warms up it pops)engine ground or battery negative / positive cable ends loose?
 

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Now I rode it and the ignition fuse popped againd. Luckily I hadn’t even gone a block away. Lol
I used to work on aircraft electrician, and the first thing is get a wiring diagram for your year bike. 2nd; Run down the wires that go to the fuse that is opening up. What I mean is, isolate the power wire and the load wire to wherever they are going to and from that particular fuse. Power wire supplies the power to the load, when the demand, or rather "LOAD" which can be anything, turn signal, fuel pump, power to the coil, whatever... draws too much current, the "Rated 5A, 10A, etc... " fuse heats up and melts to protect the wiring from heating up also and melting. Seen that happen when the breaker wouldn't pop and the wire melted almost immediately, not just the insulation, the copper wire inside the insulation. Had to run another wire from start to finish on an aircraft. That sucks!

Isolating the wires going to and from the fuse allows you to "wring" each leg out to ensure you don't have an intermittent open that's grounding the load wire (or power wire going into the fuse to the load) grounding against the frame, or somewhere its causing a dead short to ground prior to the load. The "Ground" is basically after the load, so it can't be a ground after the load being intermittent, the ground allows the circuit to make it's "circle" . Can't have a circuit without a grd return.



3th; You'll need some sort of Mega Ohm meter {**}. Not just a Ohm meter. A Mega Ohm meter generates a lot of voltage, but little current, and if you have a "Wire in that circuit" that been chaffed through vibration (rubbing on something that has slightly opened up the insulation ~ common in MCs as I'm sure you will agree to the vibration that is evident in 99% of all MCs, well most MCs) so that as the MC moves and vibrates it allows a direct short to ground prior to the load and then the fuse melts >>> hopefully. The Mega Ohm meter will show a high resistance reading ~ infinity, or a short to ground ~ 0 ohms. 0 ohms is NOT what you want with a Mega Ohm meter, shows that you have the ability for the electricity to "Escape" to ground and NOT the load where it's supposed to go. Wringing the wires out with a Ohm meter ... end to end shows 0 or low resistance tells you don't have an open in the wire, but that doesn't tell you much of anything really. The wires is good going from power to fuse, to load, but it doesn't tell you if it's grounding out against the frame, etc... . Checking wire to frame if its a dead short will show up on a Ohm meter, and if that's all you have, then read from circuit to ground, and should read infinity, NOT GROUNDED OUT, but Ohm meters don't have the voltage to jump through insulation that has broken down, or is close to a direct short. Mega Ohm meter has that kind of juice, high voltage, not high current. A over load situation is happening, due to a short to grd, or a component is drawing too much current is my guess. (and that's all that is, is a guess)

{**} Megohmmeter - Wikipedia

I haven't worked as an aviation electrician in many years, but if you isolate the circuit that is off that fuse ~ disconnect the connectors providing power and then the connectors at the load, and wring the wiring out and find there is no open circuit to ground, then at least the wiring to and from is good. Next move on to the load it's self, components, whatever. IF BOTH SIDES OF THE WIRING FOR THAT CIRCUIT FROM THAT FUSE IS GOOD, then at least the wiring is proven good, and that's at least 1/2 the battle IMO.

Always divide the circuit in two, and work one end, prove it's solid, then work the other end, prove it's solid, and then work the components. Of course if it's a component that you think is bad and you spent the $$$ up front to replace, or have it repaired and it doesn't fix it, well, you can continue to "Shotgun" the entire circuit and hopefully you will stumble on to what is causing the short to ground that is blowing your fuse... and before you go broke of course. Good Luck.

These things sometimes just take a bit of time going through the circuit and FINDING the CAUSE. Carting a MC home is not cheap, simple or pleasant, and until you have PROVED the circuit by finding something absolute concrete that is causing this, you will always have doubts when you take your bike. Take from an old guy, do your homework, find the problem, don't SHOTGUN a system because you think it could be this or that. Prove what is bad, and then you'll know, and you can feel the confident riding your MC again.
 
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