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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First of all *No Flames* because of my age. I just wanted to research a lil' early since I have money saved up and less than a year left until I am 16.

I am thinking about riding a motorbike during high school ( to take me back and forth from school and home ) I am pretty much set on an older 250 (cheap).

Some people say you should get a car first instead of a bike. I plan on driving my parent's car until college.

I'm just asking, it would be O.K. to have the motorcycle first right?

Thanks! :D
 

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Why not?
 

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The biggest issue I see is learning too many things at one time. With experience you gain a sense for how traffic flows and what other drivers are going to do. I'd say it's one of the biggest factors in street survivability and the reason so many riders get run off the road or end up with a car turning right into their path.

Riding a motorcycle is already a demanding task in itself, just learning how to control it and make it go where you want it to leaves a diminished capability to deal with traffic. Not the odds I would choose.

On the flip side the younger you are they easier it is to learn.
 

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i have no idea what the law is like anywhere else but here in illinois you cannot operate a motorcycle until your 18 years old UNLESS you take and pass a state approved and held motorcycle training course which is like 22 hours long. and then you still need to take the actual test at the DMV so might be something to look into.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
also, instead of making a different topic... I'll just ask here. Driver's licenses are required to take the MSF, right?

And I don't plan on riding on highways that much, probably just some fun rides around the city and just take me from school to home, home to work. That's all.
 

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MSF issues the motorcycle license after you sucessfuly complete their basic courses over one weekend.


Practice riding in low traffic areas like side streets and parking lots until you feel confident enough to go on the main streets. Stay off the freeways and highways cause you won't have those skills until you have a month of riding under your belt. ;)
 

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I swear we just had this thread a week ago. Buy a car, get some time commuting on the roads, learning the ins and outs and when you've got some cage time under your belt, consider buying a bike. In the mean time I suggest buying an old trail bike and learning to ride out in the country. Seriously.
 

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My first vehicle was a bike. When I got my driver's license at 16, it had a "Motorcycle Only" stipulation on it. We did not have MSF courses, we had a written test followed by a driving test. The rider had to wear an intercom radio inside of his helmet and was followed by an examiner in a car. We set out on the downtown streets and the examiner told me where to turn, stop, etc. As long as all of the rules were followed, and the rider was graceful, he received his license.

Let it be known that I wrecked several times when I was younger.
 

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What state are you in?

Since you already have access to your parent's car, I would say learn on that for a year or, so. Then after you are pretty good in the car, migrate to the bike. Bike's can be very expensive, so that extra year of saving could help you a lot when you do move to the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm in MA.

Do you think weekend practices with an old bike in a huge parking lot would help in getting the basics of riding down? ( huge costco lot, on closed store days )

I would definitely have someone experienced with me to teach me/watch over me.
 

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Any experience is going to help you. And having a great teacher is always a good thing.

As for your earlier question about the MSF course, check your state's laws on younger drivers getting their endorsement. It varies greatly by state.
 
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