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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone. Just got back from my first track day, which was fun, but also served to emphasize how much I have to learn. So, I'm thinking of taking a riding class.

Currently, I'm leaning [no pun intended] toward taking Jason Pridmore's STAR 2-day class. I was originally planning to take one of Keith Code's classes, but it seems there are a lot of disillusioned students from that school. Does anyone have any recommendations for schools, especially those that are convenient for people in LA? Thanks in advance.
 

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I've taken 3 of the DP safety school "classes". Don't let the name fool you, he hires racers as instructors. More expensive than a track day, but you can get some really good feedback.

I would recommend trying to ride with James Randolph Jr. Super nice guy. You can even buy a one on one for the whole day. Bring 2 sets of tires, you can ride like 6 hours worth in one day.

I was going to the CA Superbike school just to ride a 03 ZX6 but that was pretty pricey.

Thunder Hill, CA
Sears Point, CA
Leguna Seca, CA
and counting

http://www.sportbikerider.us/Sportbike_Rider/Pictures38/IMG_6791.JPG
 

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I did the Jason Pridmore'two day class...good class..most of the instructors are "racers"....they teach body stearing which Keith Code says you can do it...who knows...The first day is basics the second day is all 'bout lines on the track you are riding...
 

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I have taken pridmore, class and code ..

I think that while code is a little hard to deal with (a very strict guy and very eccentric, etc..) I learned the most that has improved my track abilites in his school. I din't even like his school at first but by the end of the first day I was a believer.

As to turning ... there is no doubt that countersteering is the quickest way to get a bike turning

I am not a big fan of body steering because once you are committed to the turn (you have quit countersteering at that point) body english isn't going to do much for you. In fact you are powering on and either in lean or comming out of the lean. SO if you're going to countersteer ... I don't see much value in body steering.

CLASS is more like a safety school track day tha teaches general good habits .. not really for learning how to be fast on the track.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the suggestions, guys. DP sounds cool, but the tracks are too far from me. So I think I'll go with STAR in October or November in the Streets of Willow.

The teachers at the Fastrackriders safety school seem to follow the Keith Code school of thought (flick fast, aggressive countersteering, late apexing, etc.). So I'd like to learn Pridmore body-steering for comparison. STAR sounds like the way to do it (I also thought about CLASS, but it won't be as convenient for my schedule).
 

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Originally posted by Flachbau

I have taken pridmore, class and code ..

I think that while code is a little hard to deal with (a very strict guy and very eccentric, etc..) I learned the most that has improved my track abilites in his school. I din't even like his school at first but by the end of the first day I was a believer.
I have also attended CLASS, CSS, and STAR. I also learned the most at CSS, which incidentally offers the least track time, because their quality of instruction is highest. CLASS is great for riders that are new to the track. STAR has a star-studded group of instructors, and is likely my favorite.

If you attend any of these schools with an open mind, you will learn a lot.
 

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I don't want to miss lead anyone..the STAR teaches body steering (moving to the inside of the bike, weight the inside peg, hook your outside heel on rear set and "pull" the bike over,which I think you end up pushing on the handle bar when you do this) the at the entry of the turn you then fine tune your line by counter steering MSF style....The entry can be very aggressive with a fast flip, just watch Jason Pridmore....I think it is all counter steering...you ultimatly change the direction of the front wheel oppsite to the turn which is counter steering.
 

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Greetings! New to the forum, but not to bikes. This is my 19th year on sportbikes, with a few broken bones, contusions, and moderate amount of ground plastic behind me. I ride an Aprilia Mille on the track (schools and track days, not racing anymore) and a CBR1100XX for commuting.

I'm in this forum eyeballing '03 ZX-6R's as track weapons, since I loath and despise sportbikes on the street (too dangerous). Haven't decided yet, though I had a helluva time on my last inline sportbike and raced an '85 Ninja 600R and ’95 Gixxer 750 with AFM (CA, U.S.A.) 1996-7. I will soon re-lurk and study your collective views about the new bike, including track manners.

About schools: been to many in CA, Oregon, and WA State. dP Schools are a fine thing. If you can lasso an instructor, they're great. The C Group is a fine place to learn. They mostly cut everyone loose in the afternoon. If you ask for personal instruction, you'll usually get it. Agreed Mr. Randolph is a great instructor.

Donny Greene is probably still involved, and between him and Chris Steward I can think of no better instructors for B or A Group. Donny’s forgotten more about going fast than I’ll ever learn. Don Canet of Cycle World used to instruct, too: he's damn near AMA-fast and OMG there is a lot to learn there. Again, my info could be out of date though at least a few of these cats were still around at dP as of August 2001 (Portland, OR date).

Last year I did CLASS, just for grins. I found it an excellent school for teaching street safety. I disagree with the methods for finding optimum track lines and winning prizes. No one promised me the latter before I attended CLASS, though. I agree with another poster on this thread: there are few better schools than CLASS for those who are new to the track and want to learn some skills for street survival in a closed-course environment.

A local outfit called Adrenaline Freaks runs track days at WA, OR, and CA tracks. It’s basically open practice, and priced accordingly. Many dealerships also run impromptu track dates by invitation-only or open to all. A Portland Italian bike dealer has about five scheduled for this year, for example. I know a couple WA dealers plan Thunderhill (CA) dates. On and on… there are far more track days than time/money to do them available here in the PacNW. Heaven knows what’s cooking in the LA or SF scene, not to mention dealers back east with the cool tracks there.

Track days have exploded in the U.S. the past ten years, leading to a huge leap in tire development for “do-everything” rubber. (Examples: Bridgestone BT012SS, Pirelli Diablo, Metzeler Rennsport). The people asked, the companies responded. We live in good times.

If you want instruction, seek out a school with instructors. Track time only, try local dealer track days. I value instruction highly and always ask to be led around a few laps the first track day of the year. Insturction is mandatory for those new to track riding in general or to a particular track, lest they crash and/or perpetuate bad habits.



* No points awarded for
* "speed reholstering"
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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the detailed response, DRB NW WA State USA. Based on what you and others have said, I'm taking STAR. :)
 

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I can only comment on the Code School. 2 days at Laguna and one day at Watkins Glen. First day is basics, Level 2 day includes practice on the Lean bike to start to learn body position, Third day for Level 3 is where the magic happens with the integration of the body position to cornering technique. Can only say I can now really ride a bike with total confidence of not locking my arms which causes all the accidents. You must teach the brain what NOT to do. PS- You can't body-steet a bike. There is too much bike gyroscopic effect to counteract. You can quicken the turn in with lowering the center of gravity of your body and weight movement. Try getting a bike to turn on the highway with no hands. Not too good.
 
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