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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello! I have a Z750 -05 model, bought it just few weeks ago and am riding it since that day.

In the last two days while riding I noticed a weird vibration/rubbing feeling from the middle/rear side of the bike. Inspected what seems to be the issue and I noticed that the top part of the chain is starting to rub the chain guard just above the swing arm, and the chain is getting black dust all over it from the plastic/rubber swing arm guard. The rubbing/vibration is happening when I let off the throttle, while engine braking. When I press the clutch it sort of stops.

Inspected the rear sprocket and didn't notice any major wear, the question still remains about the front one.

I understand that this is happening because of the rear wheel (rear sprocket) going faster than the engine (front sprocket) and while engine braking it's causing the chain to curve toward the swing arm. Question is.. this is a cause of the chain being too loose or the other way around - too tight? Asking of it being too tight because I read on the internet that this maybe the cause as well, but no one is giving a 100% answear.

The other thing I noticed - the chain looks quite tight while the bike is cold in the morning. Have to check with the measuring tape. After riding, when the bike gets warmer, the chain gets a bit looser. Am a bit worried to make it too tight because of that, but all logic is pointing towards of it being too loose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Hi and welcome, exactly how old is the chain, and with how many miles of operation?

Usually, when the chain is on its way out it doesn't matter how often you tighten it or how much.
I have no idea now old the chain is, but when we (me and my friend who knows quite a lot more than me about bikes) were checking the bike before buying, it looked like the chain is fresh. The guy I bought the bike from bought it in May this year, drove the summer and sold it to me. He only changed the filters/oil and that's it.

Took some photos of the chain and rear sprocket, and noticed that I need to clean the sprockets/chain ASAP.
Here you can see the spot where the chain touches the guard, just above the swing arm.


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will the take the guards off after work and clean everything, and lube the chain again, maybe the chain is too dry because of the sand/dust collected while driving - that's why it's sticking to the sprockets and causing the curving? a dumb idea, I know :LOL:
 

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I have no idea now old the chain is, but when we (me and my friend who knows quite a lot more than me about bikes) were checking the bike before buying, it looked like the chain is fresh. The guy I bought the bike from bought it in May this year, drove the summer and sold it to me. He only changed the filters/oil and that's it.

Took some photos of the chain and rear sprocket, and noticed that I need to clean the sprockets/chain ASAP.
Here you can see the spot where the chain touches the guard, just above the swing arm...

...will the take the guards off after work and clean everything, and lube the chain again, maybe the chain is too dry because of the sand/dust collected while driving - that's why it's sticking to the sprockets and causing the curving? a dumb idea, I know :LOL:
I agree on cleaning and lubing the chain as a first step (y)

Then, if I were you, I would definitely have the chain and sprockets examined by a trusted mechanic.

But to be completely honest, I would fit a brand new chain and sprocket set, just to be sure, since the mileage on the chain is unknown.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I agree on cleaning and lubing the chain as a first step (y)

Then, if I were you, I would definitely have the chain and sprockets examined by a trusted mechanic.

But to be completely honest, I would fit a brand new chain and sprocket set, just to be sure, since the mileage on the chain is unknown.
Soo.. I cleaned the chain and the sprockets as mush as I could, lubed the chain properly. Even waited 30 minutes for it to "flow" and stick to every moving part. And you know what... the vibration/rubbing stopped :eek:

Hopefully nothing else will happen with these parts. I am planning to change them, but in the spring, not now 😅

Sorry for the dirty bike. I wanted to wash it before lubing the chain, but it started to rain..

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Soo.. I cleaned the chain and the sprockets as mush as I could, lubed the chain properly. Even waited 30 minutes for it to "flow" and stick to every moving part. And you know what... the vibration/rubbing stopped :eek:

Hopefully nothing else will happen with these parts. I am planning to change them, but in the spring, not now 😅

Sorry for the dirty bike. I wanted to wash it before lubing the chain, but it started to rain..

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Great, here's a nice thread if you want to get extra geeky with chain maintenance :D

How do YOU clean your chain? | Page 4 | Kawasaki Motorcycle Forums (kawiforums.com)

Keep an eye (and ear) on it and, when the time comes, replace the chain and sprockets as a set (y)
 
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